Rectangle 27 6

What about stack overflow by a dead loop recursive method call?

#include <windows.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void main()
{
    StackOverflow(0);
}

void StackOverflow(int depth)
{
    char blockdata[10000];
    printf("Overflow: %d\n", depth);
    StackOverflow(depth+1);
}

What would prevent a Sufficiently Smart Compiler from optimizing away both the unused stack allocation and the tail call?

@JB: unfortunatly have no idea because not familar with existing compilers optimization logic

@JB : thanks, pretty interesting know this!

@Abhinav: Just post your answer with all of these ways expressed as an examples in C++ :)

What is the easiest way to make a C++ program crash? - Stack Overflow

c++ crash
Rectangle 27 227

The abort() function is probably your best bet. It's part of the C standard library, and is defined as "causing abnormal program termination" (e.g, a fatal error or crash).

Note that a crash through abort() doesn't call any destructors or atexit functions, though that will likely not matter here.

@Xeo: If it did call destructors and atexits, it wouldn't be a crash now would it?

Since abort() is the correct answer, then should 'exit(-1);` be acceptable?

What is the easiest way to make a C++ program crash? - Stack Overflow

c++ crash
Rectangle 27 96

raise(SIGSEGV);  // simulates a standard crash when access invalid memory
                 // ie anything that can go wrong with pointers.
#include <signal.h>

I nelieve whether or not this terminates is implementation-defined...

It's more than just implementation-defined -- the signal can be caught with signal(). Most sane applications don't, though.

It will crash in exactly the same way as a normal SIGSEGV within the application (which is the way most applications crash). It is well defined what it does (by default it exits the application and generates a core file). Yes you can set a handler, but if you have one don't you want to test that in the same way!!

+1 for raise(). This lets you test for a ton of different types of exceptions by just changing the argument.

What is the easiest way to make a C++ program crash? - Stack Overflow

c++ crash
Rectangle 27 392

For Linux and I believe Mac OS X, if you're using gcc, or any compiler that uses glibc, you can use the backtrace() functions in execinfo.h to print a stacktrace and exit gracefully when you get a segmentation fault. Documentation can be found in the libc manual.

Here's an example program that installs a SIGSEGV handler and prints a stacktrace to stderr when it segfaults. The baz() function here causes the segfault that triggers the handler:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <execinfo.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>


void handler(int sig) {
  void *array[10];
  size_t size;

  // get void*'s for all entries on the stack
  size = backtrace(array, 10);

  // print out all the frames to stderr
  fprintf(stderr, "Error: signal %d:\n", sig);
  backtrace_symbols_fd(array, size, STDERR_FILENO);
  exit(1);
}

void baz() {
 int *foo = (int*)-1; // make a bad pointer
  printf("%d\n", *foo);       // causes segfault
}

void bar() { baz(); }
void foo() { bar(); }


int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  signal(SIGSEGV, handler);   // install our handler
  foo(); // this will call foo, bar, and baz.  baz segfaults.
}

Compiling with -g -rdynamic gets you symbol info in your output, which glibc can use to make a nice stacktrace:

$ gcc -g -rdynamic ./test.c -o test
$ ./test
Error: signal 11:
./test(handler+0x19)[0x400911]
/lib64/tls/libc.so.6[0x3a9b92e380]
./test(baz+0x14)[0x400962]
./test(bar+0xe)[0x400983]
./test(foo+0xe)[0x400993]
./test(main+0x28)[0x4009bd]
/lib64/tls/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xdb)[0x3a9b91c4bb]
./test[0x40086a]

This shows the load module, offset, and function that each frame in the stack came from. Here you can see the signal handler on top of the stack, and the libc functions before main in addition to main, foo, bar, and baz.

There's also /lib/libSegFault.so which you can use with LD_PRELOAD.

It looks like the first two entries in your backtrace output contain a return address inside the signal handler and probably one inside sigaction() in libc. While your backtrace appears to be correct, I have sometimes found that additional steps are necessary to ensure the actual location of the fault appears in the backtrace as it can be overwritten with sigaction() by the kernel.

What would happen if the crash comes from inside malloc? Wouldn't you then hold a lock and then get stuck as "backtrace" tries to allocate memory?

catchsegv is not what the OP needs but is awesome for catching segmentation faults and getting all the information.

How to automatically generate a stacktrace when my gcc C++ program cra...

c++ gcc crash stack-trace assert
Rectangle 27 382

For Linux and I believe Mac OS X, if you're using gcc, or any compiler that uses glibc, you can use the backtrace() functions in execinfo.h to print a stacktrace and exit gracefully when you get a segmentation fault. Documentation can be found in the libc manual.

Here's an example program that installs a SIGSEGV handler and prints a stacktrace to stderr when it segfaults. The baz() function here causes the segfault that triggers the handler:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <execinfo.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>


void handler(int sig) {
  void *array[10];
  size_t size;

  // get void*'s for all entries on the stack
  size = backtrace(array, 10);

  // print out all the frames to stderr
  fprintf(stderr, "Error: signal %d:\n", sig);
  backtrace_symbols_fd(array, size, STDERR_FILENO);
  exit(1);
}

void baz() {
 int *foo = (int*)-1; // make a bad pointer
  printf("%d\n", *foo);       // causes segfault
}

void bar() { baz(); }
void foo() { bar(); }


int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  signal(SIGSEGV, handler);   // install our handler
  foo(); // this will call foo, bar, and baz.  baz segfaults.
}

Compiling with -g -rdynamic gets you symbol info in your output, which glibc can use to make a nice stacktrace:

$ gcc -g -rdynamic ./test.c -o test
$ ./test
Error: signal 11:
./test(handler+0x19)[0x400911]
/lib64/tls/libc.so.6[0x3a9b92e380]
./test(baz+0x14)[0x400962]
./test(bar+0xe)[0x400983]
./test(foo+0xe)[0x400993]
./test(main+0x28)[0x4009bd]
/lib64/tls/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xdb)[0x3a9b91c4bb]
./test[0x40086a]

This shows the load module, offset, and function that each frame in the stack came from. Here you can see the signal handler on top of the stack, and the libc functions before main in addition to main, foo, bar, and baz.

There's also /lib/libSegFault.so which you can use with LD_PRELOAD.

It looks like the first two entries in your backtrace output contain a return address inside the signal handler and probably one inside sigaction() in libc. While your backtrace appears to be correct, I have sometimes found that additional steps are necessary to ensure the actual location of the fault appears in the backtrace as it can be overwritten with sigaction() by the kernel.

What would happen if the crash comes from inside malloc? Wouldn't you then hold a lock and then get stuck as "backtrace" tries to allocate memory?

catchsegv is not what the OP needs but is awesome for catching segmentation faults and getting all the information.

You could then try some other stackwalking API, e.g.: DynInst's StackwalkerAPI dyninst.org/stackwalkerapi or nongnu.org/libunwind. Generally if you expect to walk out of stack frames or interrupt frames inside malloc, you need to do special things to handle it. Many tools use their own arena allocator to avoid conflicting with the libc malloc in situations like this.

How to generate a stacktrace when my gcc C++ app crashes - Stack Overf...

c++ gcc crash stack-trace assert
Rectangle 27 382

For Linux and I believe Mac OS X, if you're using gcc, or any compiler that uses glibc, you can use the backtrace() functions in execinfo.h to print a stacktrace and exit gracefully when you get a segmentation fault. Documentation can be found in the libc manual.

Here's an example program that installs a SIGSEGV handler and prints a stacktrace to stderr when it segfaults. The baz() function here causes the segfault that triggers the handler:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <execinfo.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>


void handler(int sig) {
  void *array[10];
  size_t size;

  // get void*'s for all entries on the stack
  size = backtrace(array, 10);

  // print out all the frames to stderr
  fprintf(stderr, "Error: signal %d:\n", sig);
  backtrace_symbols_fd(array, size, STDERR_FILENO);
  exit(1);
}

void baz() {
 int *foo = (int*)-1; // make a bad pointer
  printf("%d\n", *foo);       // causes segfault
}

void bar() { baz(); }
void foo() { bar(); }


int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  signal(SIGSEGV, handler);   // install our handler
  foo(); // this will call foo, bar, and baz.  baz segfaults.
}

Compiling with -g -rdynamic gets you symbol info in your output, which glibc can use to make a nice stacktrace:

$ gcc -g -rdynamic ./test.c -o test
$ ./test
Error: signal 11:
./test(handler+0x19)[0x400911]
/lib64/tls/libc.so.6[0x3a9b92e380]
./test(baz+0x14)[0x400962]
./test(bar+0xe)[0x400983]
./test(foo+0xe)[0x400993]
./test(main+0x28)[0x4009bd]
/lib64/tls/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xdb)[0x3a9b91c4bb]
./test[0x40086a]

This shows the load module, offset, and function that each frame in the stack came from. Here you can see the signal handler on top of the stack, and the libc functions before main in addition to main, foo, bar, and baz.

There's also /lib/libSegFault.so which you can use with LD_PRELOAD.

It looks like the first two entries in your backtrace output contain a return address inside the signal handler and probably one inside sigaction() in libc. While your backtrace appears to be correct, I have sometimes found that additional steps are necessary to ensure the actual location of the fault appears in the backtrace as it can be overwritten with sigaction() by the kernel.

What would happen if the crash comes from inside malloc? Wouldn't you then hold a lock and then get stuck as "backtrace" tries to allocate memory?

catchsegv is not what the OP needs but is awesome for catching segmentation faults and getting all the information.

How to generate a stacktrace when my gcc C++ app crashes - Stack Overf...

c++ gcc crash stack-trace assert
Rectangle 27 68

int main()
{
    int i = 1 / 0;
}

Depending on how clever your compiler is this will be caught at compile time. I know that visual studio 2008 won't compile this for c++ or c#.

(1/0);
void main()

What is the easiest way to make a C++ program crash? - Stack Overflow

c++ crash
Rectangle 27 62

*((unsigned int*)0) = 0xDEAD;

"But which sane OS doesn't stop an application that tries to access memory at address 0?" -- That isn't really what you want to ask, but I'll answer anyway. In some computers there is RAM at address 0, and it is perfectly meaningful for a program to store a value there. A more meaningful question would be "Which OS doesn't stop an application that access memory at the address that a C++ implementation reserved for a null pointer?" In that case I don't know of any. But the original program is about the C++ language not about OSes.

Its undefined behavior. It is perfectly OK for this to do nothing. A machine that will not crash: Anything running a Z80 series processor (I assume (my Z80a does nothing)).

Although this isn't guaranteed to crash, it is one of the most common kinds of crash in C++. So if you want to simulate a crash, this is an "authentic" way to do it :)

What is the easiest way to make a C++ program crash? - Stack Overflow

c++ crash
Rectangle 27 45

Well, are we on stackoverflow, or not?

for (long long int i = 0; ++i; (&i)[i] = i);

(Not guaranteed to crash by any standards, but neither are any of the suggested answers including the accepted one since SIGABRT could have been caught anyway. In practice, this will crash everywhere.)

I can see that being funny on a system with non protected code pages and you overwrite your program with some code that is accidentally an infinite loop that does nothing. Highly highly highly highly unlikely but potentially possible.

@Loki: What if it just read from every 4000th byte? Would that be less likely to crash? Definitely less dangerous.

@MooingDuck: I am just making a funny comment. Don't take it that seriously :-) But it would be interesting if somebody found a a sequence of instructions that did something funny.

@LokiAstari: you're absolutely right. I was thinking about (&i)[i] += !i instead, but I feared the compiler might be clever enough and want to optimise that out. :-)

What is the easiest way to make a C++ program crash? - Stack Overflow

c++ crash
Rectangle 27 100

While the use of the backtrace() functions in execinfo.h to print a stacktrace and exit gracefully when you get a segmentation fault has already been suggested, I see no mention of the intricacies necessary to ensure the resulting backtrace points to the actual location of the fault (at least for some architectures - x86 & ARM).

The first two entries in the stack frame chain when you get into the signal handler contain a return address inside the signal handler and one inside sigaction() in libc. The stack frame of the last function called before the signal (which is the location of the fault) is lost.

#ifndef _GNU_SOURCE
#define _GNU_SOURCE
#endif
#ifndef __USE_GNU
#define __USE_GNU
#endif

#include <execinfo.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ucontext.h>
#include <unistd.h>

/* This structure mirrors the one found in /usr/include/asm/ucontext.h */
typedef struct _sig_ucontext {
 unsigned long     uc_flags;
 struct ucontext   *uc_link;
 stack_t           uc_stack;
 struct sigcontext uc_mcontext;
 sigset_t          uc_sigmask;
} sig_ucontext_t;

void crit_err_hdlr(int sig_num, siginfo_t * info, void * ucontext)
{
 void *             array[50];
 void *             caller_address;
 char **            messages;
 int                size, i;
 sig_ucontext_t *   uc;

 uc = (sig_ucontext_t *)ucontext;

 /* Get the address at the time the signal was raised */
#if defined(__i386__) // gcc specific
 caller_address = (void *) uc->uc_mcontext.eip; // EIP: x86 specific
#elif defined(__x86_64__) // gcc specific
 caller_address = (void *) uc->uc_mcontext.rip; // RIP: x86_64 specific
#else
#error Unsupported architecture. // TODO: Add support for other arch.
#endif

 fprintf(stderr, "signal %d (%s), address is %p from %p\n", 
  sig_num, strsignal(sig_num), info->si_addr, 
  (void *)caller_address);

 size = backtrace(array, 50);

 /* overwrite sigaction with caller's address */
 array[1] = caller_address;

 messages = backtrace_symbols(array, size);

 /* skip first stack frame (points here) */
 for (i = 1; i < size && messages != NULL; ++i)
 {
  fprintf(stderr, "[bt]: (%d) %s\n", i, messages[i]);
 }

 free(messages);

 exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

int crash()
{
 char * p = NULL;
 *p = 0;
 return 0;
}

int foo4()
{
 crash();
 return 0;
}

int foo3()
{
 foo4();
 return 0;
}

int foo2()
{
 foo3();
 return 0;
}

int foo1()
{
 foo2();
 return 0;
}

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
 struct sigaction sigact;

 sigact.sa_sigaction = crit_err_hdlr;
 sigact.sa_flags = SA_RESTART | SA_SIGINFO;

 if (sigaction(SIGSEGV, &sigact, (struct sigaction *)NULL) != 0)
 {
  fprintf(stderr, "error setting signal handler for %d (%s)\n",
    SIGSEGV, strsignal(SIGSEGV));

  exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
 }

 foo1();

 exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}
signal 11 (Segmentation fault), address is (nil) from 0x8c50
[bt]: (1) ./test(crash+0x24) [0x8c50]
[bt]: (2) ./test(foo4+0x10) [0x8c70]
[bt]: (3) ./test(foo3+0x10) [0x8c8c]
[bt]: (4) ./test(foo2+0x10) [0x8ca8]
[bt]: (5) ./test(foo1+0x10) [0x8cc4]
[bt]: (6) ./test(main+0x74) [0x8d44]
[bt]: (7) /lib/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xa8) [0x40032e44]

All the hazards of calling the backtrace() functions in a signal handler still exist and should not be overlooked, but I find the functionality I described here quite helpful in debugging crashes.

It is important to note that the example I provided is developed/tested on Linux for x86. I have also successfully implemented this on ARM using uc_mcontext.arm_pc instead of uc_mcontext.eip.

Here's a link to the article where I learned the details for this implementation: http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/6391

On systems using GNU ld, remember to compile with -rdynamic to instruct the linker to add all symbols, not only used ones, to the dynamic symbol table. This allows backtrace_symbols() to convert addresses to function names

This may be too late but can we use addr2line command somehow to get the exact line where the crash occurred?

On more recent builds of glibc uc_mcontext does not contain a field named eip. There is now an array that needs to be indexed, uc_mcontext.gregs[REG_EIP] is the equivalent.

How to automatically generate a stacktrace when my gcc C++ program cra...

c++ gcc crash stack-trace assert
Rectangle 27 98

While the use of the backtrace() functions in execinfo.h to print a stacktrace and exit gracefully when you get a segmentation fault has already been suggested, I see no mention of the intricacies necessary to ensure the resulting backtrace points to the actual location of the fault (at least for some architectures - x86 & ARM).

The first two entries in the stack frame chain when you get into the signal handler contain a return address inside the signal handler and one inside sigaction() in libc. The stack frame of the last function called before the signal (which is the location of the fault) is lost.

#ifndef _GNU_SOURCE
#define _GNU_SOURCE
#endif
#ifndef __USE_GNU
#define __USE_GNU
#endif

#include <execinfo.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ucontext.h>
#include <unistd.h>

/* This structure mirrors the one found in /usr/include/asm/ucontext.h */
typedef struct _sig_ucontext {
 unsigned long     uc_flags;
 struct ucontext   *uc_link;
 stack_t           uc_stack;
 struct sigcontext uc_mcontext;
 sigset_t          uc_sigmask;
} sig_ucontext_t;

void crit_err_hdlr(int sig_num, siginfo_t * info, void * ucontext)
{
 void *             array[50];
 void *             caller_address;
 char **            messages;
 int                size, i;
 sig_ucontext_t *   uc;

 uc = (sig_ucontext_t *)ucontext;

 /* Get the address at the time the signal was raised */
#if defined(__i386__) // gcc specific
 caller_address = (void *) uc->uc_mcontext.eip; // EIP: x86 specific
#elif defined(__x86_64__) // gcc specific
 caller_address = (void *) uc->uc_mcontext.rip; // RIP: x86_64 specific
#else
#error Unsupported architecture. // TODO: Add support for other arch.
#endif

 fprintf(stderr, "signal %d (%s), address is %p from %p\n", 
  sig_num, strsignal(sig_num), info->si_addr, 
  (void *)caller_address);

 size = backtrace(array, 50);

 /* overwrite sigaction with caller's address */
 array[1] = caller_address;

 messages = backtrace_symbols(array, size);

 /* skip first stack frame (points here) */
 for (i = 1; i < size && messages != NULL; ++i)
 {
  fprintf(stderr, "[bt]: (%d) %s\n", i, messages[i]);
 }

 free(messages);

 exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

int crash()
{
 char * p = NULL;
 *p = 0;
 return 0;
}

int foo4()
{
 crash();
 return 0;
}

int foo3()
{
 foo4();
 return 0;
}

int foo2()
{
 foo3();
 return 0;
}

int foo1()
{
 foo2();
 return 0;
}

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
 struct sigaction sigact;

 sigact.sa_sigaction = crit_err_hdlr;
 sigact.sa_flags = SA_RESTART | SA_SIGINFO;

 if (sigaction(SIGSEGV, &sigact, (struct sigaction *)NULL) != 0)
 {
  fprintf(stderr, "error setting signal handler for %d (%s)\n",
    SIGSEGV, strsignal(SIGSEGV));

  exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
 }

 foo1();

 exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}
signal 11 (Segmentation fault), address is (nil) from 0x8c50
[bt]: (1) ./test(crash+0x24) [0x8c50]
[bt]: (2) ./test(foo4+0x10) [0x8c70]
[bt]: (3) ./test(foo3+0x10) [0x8c8c]
[bt]: (4) ./test(foo2+0x10) [0x8ca8]
[bt]: (5) ./test(foo1+0x10) [0x8cc4]
[bt]: (6) ./test(main+0x74) [0x8d44]
[bt]: (7) /lib/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xa8) [0x40032e44]

All the hazards of calling the backtrace() functions in a signal handler still exist and should not be overlooked, but I find the functionality I described here quite helpful in debugging crashes.

It is important to note that the example I provided is developed/tested on Linux for x86. I have also successfully implemented this on ARM using uc_mcontext.arm_pc instead of uc_mcontext.eip.

Here's a link to the article where I learned the details for this implementation: http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/6391

On systems using GNU ld, remember to compile with -rdynamic to instruct the linker to add all symbols, not only used ones, to the dynamic symbol table. This allows backtrace_symbols() to convert addresses to function names

This may be too late but can we use addr2line command somehow to get the exact line where the crash occurred?

On more recent builds of glibc uc_mcontext does not contain a field named eip. There is now an array that needs to be indexed, uc_mcontext.gregs[REG_EIP] is the equivalent.

How to generate a stacktrace when my gcc C++ app crashes - Stack Overf...

c++ gcc crash stack-trace assert
Rectangle 27 98

While the use of the backtrace() functions in execinfo.h to print a stacktrace and exit gracefully when you get a segmentation fault has already been suggested, I see no mention of the intricacies necessary to ensure the resulting backtrace points to the actual location of the fault (at least for some architectures - x86 & ARM).

The first two entries in the stack frame chain when you get into the signal handler contain a return address inside the signal handler and one inside sigaction() in libc. The stack frame of the last function called before the signal (which is the location of the fault) is lost.

#ifndef _GNU_SOURCE
#define _GNU_SOURCE
#endif
#ifndef __USE_GNU
#define __USE_GNU
#endif

#include <execinfo.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ucontext.h>
#include <unistd.h>

/* This structure mirrors the one found in /usr/include/asm/ucontext.h */
typedef struct _sig_ucontext {
 unsigned long     uc_flags;
 struct ucontext   *uc_link;
 stack_t           uc_stack;
 struct sigcontext uc_mcontext;
 sigset_t          uc_sigmask;
} sig_ucontext_t;

void crit_err_hdlr(int sig_num, siginfo_t * info, void * ucontext)
{
 void *             array[50];
 void *             caller_address;
 char **            messages;
 int                size, i;
 sig_ucontext_t *   uc;

 uc = (sig_ucontext_t *)ucontext;

 /* Get the address at the time the signal was raised */
#if defined(__i386__) // gcc specific
 caller_address = (void *) uc->uc_mcontext.eip; // EIP: x86 specific
#elif defined(__x86_64__) // gcc specific
 caller_address = (void *) uc->uc_mcontext.rip; // RIP: x86_64 specific
#else
#error Unsupported architecture. // TODO: Add support for other arch.
#endif

 fprintf(stderr, "signal %d (%s), address is %p from %p\n", 
  sig_num, strsignal(sig_num), info->si_addr, 
  (void *)caller_address);

 size = backtrace(array, 50);

 /* overwrite sigaction with caller's address */
 array[1] = caller_address;

 messages = backtrace_symbols(array, size);

 /* skip first stack frame (points here) */
 for (i = 1; i < size && messages != NULL; ++i)
 {
  fprintf(stderr, "[bt]: (%d) %s\n", i, messages[i]);
 }

 free(messages);

 exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

int crash()
{
 char * p = NULL;
 *p = 0;
 return 0;
}

int foo4()
{
 crash();
 return 0;
}

int foo3()
{
 foo4();
 return 0;
}

int foo2()
{
 foo3();
 return 0;
}

int foo1()
{
 foo2();
 return 0;
}

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
 struct sigaction sigact;

 sigact.sa_sigaction = crit_err_hdlr;
 sigact.sa_flags = SA_RESTART | SA_SIGINFO;

 if (sigaction(SIGSEGV, &sigact, (struct sigaction *)NULL) != 0)
 {
  fprintf(stderr, "error setting signal handler for %d (%s)\n",
    SIGSEGV, strsignal(SIGSEGV));

  exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
 }

 foo1();

 exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}
signal 11 (Segmentation fault), address is (nil) from 0x8c50
[bt]: (1) ./test(crash+0x24) [0x8c50]
[bt]: (2) ./test(foo4+0x10) [0x8c70]
[bt]: (3) ./test(foo3+0x10) [0x8c8c]
[bt]: (4) ./test(foo2+0x10) [0x8ca8]
[bt]: (5) ./test(foo1+0x10) [0x8cc4]
[bt]: (6) ./test(main+0x74) [0x8d44]
[bt]: (7) /lib/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xa8) [0x40032e44]

All the hazards of calling the backtrace() functions in a signal handler still exist and should not be overlooked, but I find the functionality I described here quite helpful in debugging crashes.

It is important to note that the example I provided is developed/tested on Linux for x86. I have also successfully implemented this on ARM using uc_mcontext.arm_pc instead of uc_mcontext.eip.

Here's a link to the article where I learned the details for this implementation: http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/6391

On systems using GNU ld, remember to compile with -rdynamic to instruct the linker to add all symbols, not only used ones, to the dynamic symbol table. This allows backtrace_symbols() to convert addresses to function names

This may be too late but can we use addr2line command somehow to get the exact line where the crash occurred?

On more recent builds of glibc uc_mcontext does not contain a field named eip. There is now an array that needs to be indexed, uc_mcontext.gregs[REG_EIP] is the equivalent.

How to generate a stacktrace when my gcc C++ app crashes - Stack Overf...

c++ gcc crash stack-trace assert
Rectangle 27 88

It's even easier than "man backtrace", there's a little-documented library (GNU specific) distributed with glibc as libSegFault.so, which was I believe was written by Ulrich Drepper to support the program catchsegv (see "man catchsegv").

This gives us 3 possibilities. Instead of running "program -o hai":

$ catchsegv program -o hai
$ LD_PRELOAD=/lib/libSegFault.so program -o hai
$ gcc -g1 -lSegFault -o program program.cc
$ program -o hai

In all 3 cases, you will get clearer backtraces with less optimization (gcc -O0 or -O1) and debugging symbols (gcc -g). Otherwise, you may just end up with a pile of memory addresses.

You can also catch more signals for stack traces with something like:

$ export SEGFAULT_SIGNALS="all"       # "all" signals
$ export SEGFAULT_SIGNALS="bus abrt"  # SIGBUS and SIGABRT

The output will look something like this (notice the backtrace at the bottom):

*** Segmentation fault Register dump:

 EAX: 0000000c   EBX: 00000080   ECX:
00000000   EDX: 0000000c  ESI:
bfdbf080   EDI: 080497e0   EBP:
bfdbee38   ESP: bfdbee20

 EIP: 0805640f   EFLAGS: 00010282

 CS: 0073   DS: 007b   ES: 007b   FS:
0000   GS: 0033   SS: 007b

 Trap: 0000000e   Error: 00000004  
OldMask: 00000000  ESP/signal:
bfdbee20   CR2: 00000024

 FPUCW: ffff037f   FPUSW: ffff0000  
TAG: ffffffff  IPOFF: 00000000  
CSSEL: 0000   DATAOFF: 00000000  
DATASEL: 0000

 ST(0) 0000 0000000000000000   ST(1)
0000 0000000000000000  ST(2) 0000
0000000000000000   ST(3) 0000
0000000000000000  ST(4) 0000
0000000000000000   ST(5) 0000
0000000000000000  ST(6) 0000
0000000000000000   ST(7) 0000
0000000000000000

Backtrace:
/lib/libSegFault.so[0xb7f9e100]
??:0(??)[0xb7fa3400]
/usr/include/c++/4.3/bits/stl_queue.h:226(_ZNSt5queueISsSt5dequeISsSaISsEEE4pushERKSs)[0x805647a]
/home/dbingham/src/middle-earth-mud/alpha6/src/engine/player.cpp:73(_ZN6Player5inputESs)[0x805377c]
/home/dbingham/src/middle-earth-mud/alpha6/src/engine/socket.cpp:159(_ZN6Socket4ReadEv)[0x8050698]
/home/dbingham/src/middle-earth-mud/alpha6/src/engine/socket.cpp:413(_ZN12ServerSocket4ReadEv)[0x80507ad]
/home/dbingham/src/middle-earth-mud/alpha6/src/engine/socket.cpp:300(_ZN12ServerSocket4pollEv)[0x8050b44]
/home/dbingham/src/middle-earth-mud/alpha6/src/engine/main.cpp:34(main)[0x8049a72]
/lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xe5)[0xb7d1b775]
/build/buildd/glibc-2.9/csu/../sysdeps/i386/elf/start.S:122(_start)[0x8049801]

@crafter: What do you mean "does not work". What have you tried, on what language/compiler/toolchain/distribution/hardware ? Did it fail to compile ? To catch error ? To produce output at all ? To produce hard-to-use output ? Thank you for details it will help everyone.

'best source is unfortunately the source' ... Hopefully, some day, the man page for catchsegv will actually mention SEGFAULT_SIGNALS. Until then, there's this answer to refer to.

I can't believe I've been programming C for 5 years and never heard of this :/

@StphaneGourichon @HansKratz To link with libSegFault you'll have to add -Wl,--no-as-needed to the compiler flags. Otherwise, ld will indeed not link against libSegFault, because it recognizes that the binary doesn't use any of its symbols.

How to automatically generate a stacktrace when my gcc C++ program cra...

c++ gcc crash stack-trace assert
Rectangle 27 86

It's even easier than "man backtrace", there's a little-documented library (GNU specific) distributed with glibc as libSegFault.so, which was I believe was written by Ulrich Drepper to support the program catchsegv (see "man catchsegv").

This gives us 3 possibilities. Instead of running "program -o hai":

$ catchsegv program -o hai
$ LD_PRELOAD=/lib/libSegFault.so program -o hai
$ gcc -g1 -lSegFault -o program program.cc
$ program -o hai

In all 3 cases, you will get clearer backtraces with less optimization (gcc -O0 or -O1) and debugging symbols (gcc -g). Otherwise, you may just end up with a pile of memory addresses.

You can also catch more signals for stack traces with something like:

$ export SEGFAULT_SIGNALS="all"       # "all" signals
$ export SEGFAULT_SIGNALS="bus abrt"  # SIGBUS and SIGABRT

The output will look something like this (notice the backtrace at the bottom):

*** Segmentation fault Register dump:

 EAX: 0000000c   EBX: 00000080   ECX:
00000000   EDX: 0000000c  ESI:
bfdbf080   EDI: 080497e0   EBP:
bfdbee38   ESP: bfdbee20

 EIP: 0805640f   EFLAGS: 00010282

 CS: 0073   DS: 007b   ES: 007b   FS:
0000   GS: 0033   SS: 007b

 Trap: 0000000e   Error: 00000004  
OldMask: 00000000  ESP/signal:
bfdbee20   CR2: 00000024

 FPUCW: ffff037f   FPUSW: ffff0000  
TAG: ffffffff  IPOFF: 00000000  
CSSEL: 0000   DATAOFF: 00000000  
DATASEL: 0000

 ST(0) 0000 0000000000000000   ST(1)
0000 0000000000000000  ST(2) 0000
0000000000000000   ST(3) 0000
0000000000000000  ST(4) 0000
0000000000000000   ST(5) 0000
0000000000000000  ST(6) 0000
0000000000000000   ST(7) 0000
0000000000000000

Backtrace:
/lib/libSegFault.so[0xb7f9e100]
??:0(??)[0xb7fa3400]
/usr/include/c++/4.3/bits/stl_queue.h:226(_ZNSt5queueISsSt5dequeISsSaISsEEE4pushERKSs)[0x805647a]
/home/dbingham/src/middle-earth-mud/alpha6/src/engine/player.cpp:73(_ZN6Player5inputESs)[0x805377c]
/home/dbingham/src/middle-earth-mud/alpha6/src/engine/socket.cpp:159(_ZN6Socket4ReadEv)[0x8050698]
/home/dbingham/src/middle-earth-mud/alpha6/src/engine/socket.cpp:413(_ZN12ServerSocket4ReadEv)[0x80507ad]
/home/dbingham/src/middle-earth-mud/alpha6/src/engine/socket.cpp:300(_ZN12ServerSocket4pollEv)[0x8050b44]
/home/dbingham/src/middle-earth-mud/alpha6/src/engine/main.cpp:34(main)[0x8049a72]
/lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xe5)[0xb7d1b775]
/build/buildd/glibc-2.9/csu/../sysdeps/i386/elf/start.S:122(_start)[0x8049801]

@crafter: What do you mean "does not work". What have you tried, on what language/compiler/toolchain/distribution/hardware ? Did it fail to compile ? To catch error ? To produce output at all ? To produce hard-to-use output ? Thank you for details it will help everyone.

'best source is unfortunately the source' ... Hopefully, some day, the man page for catchsegv will actually mention SEGFAULT_SIGNALS. Until then, there's this answer to refer to.

I can't believe I've been programming C for 5 years and never heard of this :/

@StphaneGourichon @HansKratz To link with libSegFault you'll have to add -Wl,--no-as-needed to the compiler flags. Otherwise, ld will indeed not link against libSegFault, because it recognizes that the binary doesn't use any of its symbols.

How to generate a stacktrace when my gcc C++ app crashes - Stack Overf...

c++ gcc crash stack-trace assert
Rectangle 27 86

It's even easier than "man backtrace", there's a little-documented library (GNU specific) distributed with glibc as libSegFault.so, which was I believe was written by Ulrich Drepper to support the program catchsegv (see "man catchsegv").

This gives us 3 possibilities. Instead of running "program -o hai":

$ catchsegv program -o hai
$ LD_PRELOAD=/lib/libSegFault.so program -o hai
$ gcc -g1 -lSegFault -o program program.cc
$ program -o hai

In all 3 cases, you will get clearer backtraces with less optimization (gcc -O0 or -O1) and debugging symbols (gcc -g). Otherwise, you may just end up with a pile of memory addresses.

You can also catch more signals for stack traces with something like:

$ export SEGFAULT_SIGNALS="all"       # "all" signals
$ export SEGFAULT_SIGNALS="bus abrt"  # SIGBUS and SIGABRT

The output will look something like this (notice the backtrace at the bottom):

*** Segmentation fault Register dump:

 EAX: 0000000c   EBX: 00000080   ECX:
00000000   EDX: 0000000c  ESI:
bfdbf080   EDI: 080497e0   EBP:
bfdbee38   ESP: bfdbee20

 EIP: 0805640f   EFLAGS: 00010282

 CS: 0073   DS: 007b   ES: 007b   FS:
0000   GS: 0033   SS: 007b

 Trap: 0000000e   Error: 00000004  
OldMask: 00000000  ESP/signal:
bfdbee20   CR2: 00000024

 FPUCW: ffff037f   FPUSW: ffff0000  
TAG: ffffffff  IPOFF: 00000000  
CSSEL: 0000   DATAOFF: 00000000  
DATASEL: 0000

 ST(0) 0000 0000000000000000   ST(1)
0000 0000000000000000  ST(2) 0000
0000000000000000   ST(3) 0000
0000000000000000  ST(4) 0000
0000000000000000   ST(5) 0000
0000000000000000  ST(6) 0000
0000000000000000   ST(7) 0000
0000000000000000

Backtrace:
/lib/libSegFault.so[0xb7f9e100]
??:0(??)[0xb7fa3400]
/usr/include/c++/4.3/bits/stl_queue.h:226(_ZNSt5queueISsSt5dequeISsSaISsEEE4pushERKSs)[0x805647a]
/home/dbingham/src/middle-earth-mud/alpha6/src/engine/player.cpp:73(_ZN6Player5inputESs)[0x805377c]
/home/dbingham/src/middle-earth-mud/alpha6/src/engine/socket.cpp:159(_ZN6Socket4ReadEv)[0x8050698]
/home/dbingham/src/middle-earth-mud/alpha6/src/engine/socket.cpp:413(_ZN12ServerSocket4ReadEv)[0x80507ad]
/home/dbingham/src/middle-earth-mud/alpha6/src/engine/socket.cpp:300(_ZN12ServerSocket4pollEv)[0x8050b44]
/home/dbingham/src/middle-earth-mud/alpha6/src/engine/main.cpp:34(main)[0x8049a72]
/lib/tls/i686/cmov/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xe5)[0xb7d1b775]
/build/buildd/glibc-2.9/csu/../sysdeps/i386/elf/start.S:122(_start)[0x8049801]

@crafter: What do you mean "does not work". What have you tried, on what language/compiler/toolchain/distribution/hardware ? Did it fail to compile ? To catch error ? To produce output at all ? To produce hard-to-use output ? Thank you for details it will help everyone.

'best source is unfortunately the source' ... Hopefully, some day, the man page for catchsegv will actually mention SEGFAULT_SIGNALS. Until then, there's this answer to refer to.

I can't believe I've been programming C for 5 years and never heard of this :/

@StphaneGourichon @HansKratz To link with libSegFault you'll have to add -Wl,--no-as-needed to the compiler flags. Otherwise, ld will indeed not link against libSegFault, because it recognizes that the binary doesn't use any of its symbols.

How to generate a stacktrace when my gcc C++ app crashes - Stack Overf...

c++ gcc crash stack-trace assert
Rectangle 27 70

Even though a correct answer has been provided that describes how to use the GNU libc backtrace() function1 and I provided my own answer that describes how to ensure a backtrace from a signal handler points to the actual location of the fault2, I don't see any mention of demangling C++ symbols output from the backtrace.

When obtaining backtraces from a C++ program, the output can be run through c++filt1 to demangle the symbols or by using abi::__cxa_demangle1 directly.

c++filt
__cxa_demangle

The following C++ Linux example uses the same signal handler as my other answer and demonstrates how c++filt can be used to demangle the symbols.

class foo
{
public:
    foo() { foo1(); }

private:
    void foo1() { foo2(); }
    void foo2() { foo3(); }
    void foo3() { foo4(); }
    void foo4() { crash(); }
    void crash() { char * p = NULL; *p = 0; }
};

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
    // Setup signal handler for SIGSEGV
    ...

    foo * f = new foo();
    return 0;
}
./test
./test 2>&1 | c++filt
signal 11 (Segmentation fault), address is (nil) from 0x8048e07
[bt]: (1) ./test(foo::crash(void)+0x13) [0x8048e07]
[bt]: (2) ./test(foo::foo4(void)+0x12) [0x8048dee]
[bt]: (3) ./test(foo::foo3(void)+0x12) [0x8048dd6]
[bt]: (4) ./test(foo::foo2(void)+0x12) [0x8048dbe]
[bt]: (5) ./test(foo::foo1(void)+0x12) [0x8048da6]
[bt]: (6) ./test(foo::foo(void)+0x12) [0x8048d8e]
[bt]: (7) ./test(main+0xe0) [0x8048d18]
[bt]: (8) ./test(__libc_start_main+0x95) [0x42017589]
[bt]: (9) ./test(__register_frame_info+0x3d) [0x8048981]

The following builds on the signal handler from my original answer and can replace the signal handler in the above example to demonstrate how abi::__cxa_demangle can be used to demangle the symbols. This signal handler produces the same demangled output as the above example.

void crit_err_hdlr(int sig_num, siginfo_t * info, void * ucontext)
{
    sig_ucontext_t * uc = (sig_ucontext_t *)ucontext;

    void * caller_address = (void *) uc->uc_mcontext.eip; // x86 specific

    std::cerr << "signal " << sig_num 
              << " (" << strsignal(sig_num) << "), address is " 
              << info->si_addr << " from " << caller_address 
              << std::endl << std::endl;

    void * array[50];
    int size = backtrace(array, 50);

    array[1] = caller_address;

    char ** messages = backtrace_symbols(array, size);    

    // skip first stack frame (points here)
    for (int i = 1; i < size && messages != NULL; ++i)
    {
        char *mangled_name = 0, *offset_begin = 0, *offset_end = 0;

        // find parantheses and +address offset surrounding mangled name
        for (char *p = messages[i]; *p; ++p)
        {
            if (*p == '(') 
            {
                mangled_name = p; 
            }
            else if (*p == '+') 
            {
                offset_begin = p;
            }
            else if (*p == ')')
            {
                offset_end = p;
                break;
            }
        }

        // if the line could be processed, attempt to demangle the symbol
        if (mangled_name && offset_begin && offset_end && 
            mangled_name < offset_begin)
        {
            *mangled_name++ = '\0';
            *offset_begin++ = '\0';
            *offset_end++ = '\0';

            int status;
            char * real_name = abi::__cxa_demangle(mangled_name, 0, 0, &status);

            // if demangling is successful, output the demangled function name
            if (status == 0)
            {    
                std::cerr << "[bt]: (" << i << ") " << messages[i] << " : " 
                          << real_name << "+" << offset_begin << offset_end 
                          << std::endl;

            }
            // otherwise, output the mangled function name
            else
            {
                std::cerr << "[bt]: (" << i << ") " << messages[i] << " : " 
                          << mangled_name << "+" << offset_begin << offset_end 
                          << std::endl;
            }
            free(real_name);
        }
        // otherwise, print the whole line
        else
        {
            std::cerr << "[bt]: (" << i << ") " << messages[i] << std::endl;
        }
    }
    std::cerr << std::endl;

    free(messages);

    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

Thank you for this, jschmier. I created a little bash script to feed the output of this into the addr2line utility. See: stackoverflow.com/a/15801966/1797414

Good documentation, and a straightforward header file has been posted here since 2008... panthema.net/2008/0901-stacktrace-demangled very similar to your approach :)

abi::__cxa_demangle seems to be not the async-signal-safe, so the signal handler can deadlock somewhere in malloc.

How to automatically generate a stacktrace when my gcc C++ program cra...

c++ gcc crash stack-trace assert
Rectangle 27 69

Even though a correct answer has been provided that describes how to use the GNU libc backtrace() function1 and I provided my own answer that describes how to ensure a backtrace from a signal handler points to the actual location of the fault2, I don't see any mention of demangling C++ symbols output from the backtrace.

When obtaining backtraces from a C++ program, the output can be run through c++filt1 to demangle the symbols or by using abi::__cxa_demangle1 directly.

c++filt
__cxa_demangle

The following C++ Linux example uses the same signal handler as my other answer and demonstrates how c++filt can be used to demangle the symbols.

class foo
{
public:
    foo() { foo1(); }

private:
    void foo1() { foo2(); }
    void foo2() { foo3(); }
    void foo3() { foo4(); }
    void foo4() { crash(); }
    void crash() { char * p = NULL; *p = 0; }
};

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
    // Setup signal handler for SIGSEGV
    ...

    foo * f = new foo();
    return 0;
}
./test
./test 2>&1 | c++filt
signal 11 (Segmentation fault), address is (nil) from 0x8048e07
[bt]: (1) ./test(foo::crash(void)+0x13) [0x8048e07]
[bt]: (2) ./test(foo::foo4(void)+0x12) [0x8048dee]
[bt]: (3) ./test(foo::foo3(void)+0x12) [0x8048dd6]
[bt]: (4) ./test(foo::foo2(void)+0x12) [0x8048dbe]
[bt]: (5) ./test(foo::foo1(void)+0x12) [0x8048da6]
[bt]: (6) ./test(foo::foo(void)+0x12) [0x8048d8e]
[bt]: (7) ./test(main+0xe0) [0x8048d18]
[bt]: (8) ./test(__libc_start_main+0x95) [0x42017589]
[bt]: (9) ./test(__register_frame_info+0x3d) [0x8048981]

The following builds on the signal handler from my original answer and can replace the signal handler in the above example to demonstrate how abi::__cxa_demangle can be used to demangle the symbols. This signal handler produces the same demangled output as the above example.

void crit_err_hdlr(int sig_num, siginfo_t * info, void * ucontext)
{
    sig_ucontext_t * uc = (sig_ucontext_t *)ucontext;

    void * caller_address = (void *) uc->uc_mcontext.eip; // x86 specific

    std::cerr << "signal " << sig_num 
              << " (" << strsignal(sig_num) << "), address is " 
              << info->si_addr << " from " << caller_address 
              << std::endl << std::endl;

    void * array[50];
    int size = backtrace(array, 50);

    array[1] = caller_address;

    char ** messages = backtrace_symbols(array, size);    

    // skip first stack frame (points here)
    for (int i = 1; i < size && messages != NULL; ++i)
    {
        char *mangled_name = 0, *offset_begin = 0, *offset_end = 0;

        // find parantheses and +address offset surrounding mangled name
        for (char *p = messages[i]; *p; ++p)
        {
            if (*p == '(') 
            {
                mangled_name = p; 
            }
            else if (*p == '+') 
            {
                offset_begin = p;
            }
            else if (*p == ')')
            {
                offset_end = p;
                break;
            }
        }

        // if the line could be processed, attempt to demangle the symbol
        if (mangled_name && offset_begin && offset_end && 
            mangled_name < offset_begin)
        {
            *mangled_name++ = '\0';
            *offset_begin++ = '\0';
            *offset_end++ = '\0';

            int status;
            char * real_name = abi::__cxa_demangle(mangled_name, 0, 0, &status);

            // if demangling is successful, output the demangled function name
            if (status == 0)
            {    
                std::cerr << "[bt]: (" << i << ") " << messages[i] << " : " 
                          << real_name << "+" << offset_begin << offset_end 
                          << std::endl;

            }
            // otherwise, output the mangled function name
            else
            {
                std::cerr << "[bt]: (" << i << ") " << messages[i] << " : " 
                          << mangled_name << "+" << offset_begin << offset_end 
                          << std::endl;
            }
            free(real_name);
        }
        // otherwise, print the whole line
        else
        {
            std::cerr << "[bt]: (" << i << ") " << messages[i] << std::endl;
        }
    }
    std::cerr << std::endl;

    free(messages);

    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

Thank you for this, jschmier. I created a little bash script to feed the output of this into the addr2line utility. See: stackoverflow.com/a/15801966/1797414

Good documentation, and a straightforward header file has been posted here since 2008... panthema.net/2008/0901-stacktrace-demangled very similar to your approach :)

abi::__cxa_demangle seems to be not the async-signal-safe, so the signal handler can deadlock somewhere in malloc.

How to generate a stacktrace when my gcc C++ app crashes - Stack Overf...

c++ gcc crash stack-trace assert
Rectangle 27 69

Even though a correct answer has been provided that describes how to use the GNU libc backtrace() function1 and I provided my own answer that describes how to ensure a backtrace from a signal handler points to the actual location of the fault2, I don't see any mention of demangling C++ symbols output from the backtrace.

When obtaining backtraces from a C++ program, the output can be run through c++filt1 to demangle the symbols or by using abi::__cxa_demangle1 directly.

c++filt
__cxa_demangle

The following C++ Linux example uses the same signal handler as my other answer and demonstrates how c++filt can be used to demangle the symbols.

class foo
{
public:
    foo() { foo1(); }

private:
    void foo1() { foo2(); }
    void foo2() { foo3(); }
    void foo3() { foo4(); }
    void foo4() { crash(); }
    void crash() { char * p = NULL; *p = 0; }
};

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
    // Setup signal handler for SIGSEGV
    ...

    foo * f = new foo();
    return 0;
}
./test
./test 2>&1 | c++filt
signal 11 (Segmentation fault), address is (nil) from 0x8048e07
[bt]: (1) ./test(foo::crash(void)+0x13) [0x8048e07]
[bt]: (2) ./test(foo::foo4(void)+0x12) [0x8048dee]
[bt]: (3) ./test(foo::foo3(void)+0x12) [0x8048dd6]
[bt]: (4) ./test(foo::foo2(void)+0x12) [0x8048dbe]
[bt]: (5) ./test(foo::foo1(void)+0x12) [0x8048da6]
[bt]: (6) ./test(foo::foo(void)+0x12) [0x8048d8e]
[bt]: (7) ./test(main+0xe0) [0x8048d18]
[bt]: (8) ./test(__libc_start_main+0x95) [0x42017589]
[bt]: (9) ./test(__register_frame_info+0x3d) [0x8048981]

The following builds on the signal handler from my original answer and can replace the signal handler in the above example to demonstrate how abi::__cxa_demangle can be used to demangle the symbols. This signal handler produces the same demangled output as the above example.

void crit_err_hdlr(int sig_num, siginfo_t * info, void * ucontext)
{
    sig_ucontext_t * uc = (sig_ucontext_t *)ucontext;

    void * caller_address = (void *) uc->uc_mcontext.eip; // x86 specific

    std::cerr << "signal " << sig_num 
              << " (" << strsignal(sig_num) << "), address is " 
              << info->si_addr << " from " << caller_address 
              << std::endl << std::endl;

    void * array[50];
    int size = backtrace(array, 50);

    array[1] = caller_address;

    char ** messages = backtrace_symbols(array, size);    

    // skip first stack frame (points here)
    for (int i = 1; i < size && messages != NULL; ++i)
    {
        char *mangled_name = 0, *offset_begin = 0, *offset_end = 0;

        // find parantheses and +address offset surrounding mangled name
        for (char *p = messages[i]; *p; ++p)
        {
            if (*p == '(') 
            {
                mangled_name = p; 
            }
            else if (*p == '+') 
            {
                offset_begin = p;
            }
            else if (*p == ')')
            {
                offset_end = p;
                break;
            }
        }

        // if the line could be processed, attempt to demangle the symbol
        if (mangled_name && offset_begin && offset_end && 
            mangled_name < offset_begin)
        {
            *mangled_name++ = '\0';
            *offset_begin++ = '\0';
            *offset_end++ = '\0';

            int status;
            char * real_name = abi::__cxa_demangle(mangled_name, 0, 0, &status);

            // if demangling is successful, output the demangled function name
            if (status == 0)
            {    
                std::cerr << "[bt]: (" << i << ") " << messages[i] << " : " 
                          << real_name << "+" << offset_begin << offset_end 
                          << std::endl;

            }
            // otherwise, output the mangled function name
            else
            {
                std::cerr << "[bt]: (" << i << ") " << messages[i] << " : " 
                          << mangled_name << "+" << offset_begin << offset_end 
                          << std::endl;
            }
            free(real_name);
        }
        // otherwise, print the whole line
        else
        {
            std::cerr << "[bt]: (" << i << ") " << messages[i] << std::endl;
        }
    }
    std::cerr << std::endl;

    free(messages);

    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

Thank you for this, jschmier. I created a little bash script to feed the output of this into the addr2line utility. See: stackoverflow.com/a/15801966/1797414

Good documentation, and a straightforward header file has been posted here since 2008... panthema.net/2008/0901-stacktrace-demangled very similar to your approach :)

abi::__cxa_demangle seems to be not the async-signal-safe, so the signal handler can deadlock somewhere in malloc.

How to generate a stacktrace when my gcc C++ app crashes - Stack Overf...

c++ gcc crash stack-trace assert
Rectangle 27 69

You can leave [Enable rich client visual experience] checked

I was having a lot of problems anywhere from random crashes, to crashing my Intel Graphics display driver, I turned it off and I have had no problems, it actually runs better. Maybe it will work for you

This worked for me. I installed VS2015 Community edition and tried opening iSpy32 solution, but everything froze once it opened. Working ok now.

this did not work for me :! VS still crashing daily

Ty for this tip! My VS 2015 IDE would glitch out after a 60-90 mins of use (especially if I opened and closed it a few times). This fixed my issue!

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Visual Studio 2015 crashes - Stack Overflow

visual-studio visual-studio-2015