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First, make sure that Tasks are being fetched, along with task specific fields that you want to extract, e.g. State. Next, a nested loop is needed inside the loop that iterates over user story results. Here is the code example. It queries on user stories from the current iteration and prints out FormattedID and State of tasks associated with the query results:

namespace RESTexample_storiesFromIteration
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            //Initialize the REST API
            RallyRestApi restApi;
            restApi = new RallyRestApi("user@domain.com", "1984", "https://rally1.rallydev.com", "1.43");

            //Set our Workspace and Project scopings
            String workspaceRef = "/workspace/1111";
            String projectRef = "/project/2222";
            bool projectScopingUp = false;
            bool projectScopingDown = true;

            DateTime now = DateTime.Today;
            String nowString = now.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd");

            Request iterationRequest = new Request("Iteration");
            iterationRequest.Workspace = workspaceRef;
            iterationRequest.Project = projectRef;

            iterationRequest.Fetch = new List<string>()
                {
                    "Name",
                    "StartDate",
                    "EndDate",
                    "Project",
                    "State"
                };

            String iterationQueryString = "((StartDate <= \"" + nowString + "\") AND (EndDate >= \"" + nowString + "\"))";
            iterationRequest.Query = new Query(iterationQueryString);

            QueryResult queryIterationResults = restApi.Query(iterationRequest);

            var myIteration = queryIterationResults.Results.First();
            var myIterationName = myIteration["Name"];
            var myIterationProject = myIteration["Project"];
            var myIterationProjectName = myIterationProject["Name"];

            Console.WriteLine("Name: " + myIterationName);
            Console.WriteLine("Project Ref: " + myIterationProjectName);
            Console.WriteLine("State: " + myIteration["State"]);

            // Query for Stories

            Request storyRequest = new Request("hierarchicalrequirement");
            storyRequest.Workspace = workspaceRef;
            storyRequest.Project = projectRef;
            storyRequest.ProjectScopeUp = projectScopingUp;
            storyRequest.ProjectScopeDown = projectScopingDown;
            storyRequest.Fetch = new List<string>()
                {
                    "Name",
                    "ObjectID",
                    "ScheduleState",
                    "State",
                    "FormattedID",
                    "PlanEstimate",
                    "Iteration",
                    "Tasks"
                };

            storyRequest.Query = new Query("Iteration.Name", Query.Operator.Equals, myIterationName);
            QueryResult queryStoryResults = restApi.Query(storyRequest);

            foreach (var s in queryStoryResults.Results)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("----------");
                Console.WriteLine("FormattedID: " + s["FormattedID"]);
                Console.WriteLine("Name: " + s["Name"]);
                Console.WriteLine("PlanEstimate: " + s["PlanEstimate"]);

                var tasks = s["Tasks"];

                foreach (var t in tasks)
                 {
                     Console.WriteLine("Task: " + t["FormattedID"] + " " + t["State"]);
                 }
            }

        }
    }
}

c# - How do I access a tasks collection on user stories using Rally .N...

c# .net rest rally
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ArgoUML has been my friend for many years when it comes to drawing UML. ArgoUML is a tool and you're asking about both tools and the processes used (i.e. "which artifacts do you create with the tools). We generally stick to user stories (agile project) and do not make "classical" use cases and use case documents.

Thanks, agree. Might need to do wireframes or something for the UI. Often the UI is nothing like I envisaged :)

architecture - What tools (free) do you use to design software - Stack...

design architecture uml
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There's always a risk of overdoing either the TDD design or the upfront design. So the answer is that it depends. I prefer starting with a user story/acceptance test which is the base of the requirement that my tests will aid in producing. Only after I've established that, I start writing detailed unit tests TDD-style. If the only design and thinking you do is through TDD, then you risk too much of a bottom up approach, which might give you units and classes that are excellent in isolation, but when you try to integrate them into the user story fulfilling task you might be surprised by having done it all wrong. For more inspiration on this, look att BDD.

A great "debate" about this has been recorded between Robert C. Martin and James Coplien, where the former is a TDD advocate and the latter has stated that it ruins the design of a system. This is what Robert said about TDD and design:

"There has been a feeling in the Agile community since about '99 that architecture is irrelevant, we don't need to do architecture, all we need to do is write a lots of tests and do lots of stories and do quick iterations and the code will assemble itself magically, and this has always been horse shit. I even think most of the original Agile proponents would agree that was a silliness."

James Coplien states that merely driving your design from TDD has a great risk:

"One of the things we see a lot, in a lot of projects, is that projects go south on about their 3rd sprint and they crash and burn because they cannot go any further, because they have cornered themselves architecturally. And you can't refactor your way out of this because the refactoring has to be across class categories, across class hierarchies, and you no longer can have any assurances about having the same functionality."

Also he gives a great example of how a bank account probably would look if you test drove it as compared to using your upfront knowledge to drive the architecture:

"I remember when I was talking with Kent once, about in the early days when he was proposing TDD, and this was in the sense of YAGNI and doing the simplest thing that could possibly work, and he says: 'Ok. Let's make a bank account, a savings account.' What's a savings account? It's a number and you can add to the number and you can subtract from the number. So what a saving account is, is a calculator. Let's make a calculator, and we can show that you can add to the balance and subtract from the balance. That's the simplest thing that could possibly work, everything else is an evolution of that.

If you do a real banking system, a savings account is not even an object and you are not going to refactor your way to the right architecture from that one. What a savings account is, is a process that does an iteration over an audit trail of database transactions, of deposits and interest gatherings and other shifts of the money. It's not like the savings account is some money sitting on the shelf on a bank somewhere, even though that is the user perspective, and you've just got to know that there are these relatively intricate structures in the foundations of a banking system to support the tax people and the actuaries and all these other folks, that you can't get to in an incremental way. Well, you can, because of course the banking industry has come to this after 40 years. You want to give yourself 40 years? It's not agile."

The interesting thing here is that both the TDD proponent and the TDD antagonist are saying that you need design up front.

If you have the time, watch the video. It's a great discussion between two highly influential experts, and it's only 22 minutes long.

Thanks Microserf :) I watched the video. My feeling is the same. If you put the main focus on testing the code and make tests mandatory they will somehow start to substitute for good design and architecture.

Which is the wrong way to approach TDD -- focusing on testing per se is badly practiced test-driven development.

architecture - Does Test Driven Development take the focus from Design...

design architecture tdd agile
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  • User interviews and stories: If you don't know what your users want, why would your software be useful?
  • A simple spec: Or even just be a mission statement. "Let people broadcast short messages to their subscriber lists." "Use in-degree to sort internet search results." "Let people collaboratively answer programming questions." Whatever.
  • Tangents log: A good to-do list has a "to-don't" component, so you don't obsess over things you aren't going to do (yet).
  • YAGNI: Stay on target. This is very important when working by yourself, because no one is there to tell you "No! Don't reinvent dynamic typing in Java! Get back to the project." To-don't lists help with this.
  • Test-driven development: Writing tests forces you to think about the end result, rather than getting bogged down in implementation details. You'll get bogged down enough anyway; no need to make it worse.
  • User testing: Have your buddies look at what you're making on a decently frequent schedule -- maybe once a month, maybe every week, depending on how many friends you have and how much beer/pizza you want to feed them. Pay very close attention to what they say and do and think when using the software.

And other things that only seem like they make sense in big projects can help a lot:

  • Off-site backups: Y'know. In case of house fires or floods.
  • A blog: But you're only allowed to write there when a release comes out. ;) Also helps you build an audience for your product before it even ships.

Hope this helps! Solo programming on a large project can be very daunting.

lmao YAGNI ... It started with a regexp ... then Bison ... then a virtual machine ... Wasn't I just writing a simple webapp??

+1 for TDD and the todo list.

methodology - What are some solo developer programming methodologies? ...

methodology
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I highly recommend removing your controller tests and using Cucumber stories instead -- RSpec is not as convenient for testing user-facing stuff as Cucumber is.

In Cucumber, you'd want to log in through the UI to mimic exactly what the user will do. I would tend to do the same thing in a controller spec, though some people might prefer mocking things out instead.

undefined method password_salt=
Failure/Error: @user = create!(Factory(:user))      ActiveRecord::RecordInvalid:        Validation failed: Email can't be blank, Password can't be blank

What code is giving that error? (The error message should have a filename and line number.)

before(:each) do          @user = create!(Factory(:user))          test_sign_in(@user)       end
Factory :user
create!(Factory(:user))
Factory

I'll give you the check for now, don't quite have enough reputation points for the upvote ha

Rspec, Devise, Factory girl - how to sign in Factory user through Rspe...

rspec controller devise factory-bot
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I would suggest storing votes as a list of story _ids in each user. That way you can find out what stories a user has voted for just by looking at the list. To get the users who have voted for a story you can do something like:

db.users.find({stories: story_id})

where story_id is the _id of the story in question. If you create an index on the stories field both of those queries will be fast.

Well, In fact I want to store more info in a Vote model. For example: created_at, ip, user_agent. Should I store the data in the stories list of users collection?

You could store the votes as an array of sub-documents, each like {story_id: ..., created_at: ..., ip: ...}, etc. Then the query becomes find({'stories.story_id': ...}). You can index on that, too.

Well I have a fairly big database with a few M records and will test the above scenario.

couchdb - I need an advice about NoSQL/MongoDb and data/models structu...

mongodb couchdb database nosql
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Just list the files in the stories directory and then open the one the user selected:

from os import listdir
from os.path import isfile, join
import imp

stories_path = 'path/to/modules'

# Put in stories all the modules found:
stories = [f for f in listdir(stories_path ) if isfile(join(stories_path,f))]

# Let the user select one...
selected = stories[xx]

# Import it:
story = imp.load_source('module.name', selected)

Python: list import options in subdirectory, then import one of them -...

python python-2.7
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Just list the files in the stories directory and then open the one the user selected:

from os import listdir
from os.path import isfile, join
import imp

stories_path = 'path/to/modules'

# Put in stories all the modules found:
stories = [f for f in listdir(stories_path ) if isfile(join(stories_path,f))]

# Let the user select one...
selected = stories[xx]

# Import it:
story = imp.load_source('module.name', selected)

Python: list import options in subdirectory, then import one of them -...

python python-2.7
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Just list the files in the stories directory and then open the one the user selected:

from os import listdir
from os.path import isfile, join
import imp

stories_path = 'path/to/modules'

# Put in stories all the modules found:
stories = [f for f in listdir(stories_path ) if isfile(join(stories_path,f))]

# Let the user select one...
selected = stories[xx]

# Import it:
story = imp.load_source('module.name', selected)

Python: list import options in subdirectory, then import one of them -...

python python-2.7
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Approximately 1% of visitors click on a feature. There was a total of 28,928 clicks on features for this time period. The feature was manually "switched/rotated" a total of 315,665 times. Of these clicks, 84% were on stories in position 1 with the rest split fairly evenly between the other four (~4% each)... ("Feature" refers to the individual calls-to-action that are either manually or automatically rototated in and out of view.)

The article also discusses the difference between Static carousels (i.e. ones that require manual use to scroll) and Auto-forwarding Carousels. Surprisingly the Auto Forwarding ones recieve the highest usage (8.8% of visitors clicked on the carousel - 40% of those clicks were for the item on the first slide). However the article also references the Nielsen group article stating that auto-forwarding carousels are not a good user experience)

For Static carousels the average click rate was between 1.7 - 2.3%, again with the first item in the carousel recieving significantly higher selection (48-62%).

gui-design conversion carousel
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Baseline is that you could post via OpenGraph Actions/Stories something like "User XYZ created a Trip with MapMyTrips" to the authenticated User's activities, and when Users click on it they get referred to your site and the individual Trip.

asp.net - Is it possible to post on facebook wall an edited google map...

asp.net facebook google-maps-api-3 asp.net-mvc-5
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Carousal is not at all a good idea. People scroll on a carousel only if it directly involves their interests or if it's showcasing really attractive images. For example new deals, new stories, amazing offers.

Let's say you have a clothing website. A carousel about sales over the website will be used more or the carousel showing how easy is the new checkout procedure.

Many users will miss out on your new features because some will never scroll the carousel or would have scrolled down by the time carousel is switching itself. Even if you stick with that idea by putting in more efficient infographics. I will still say it will still not budge in the required results.

Actually, this is more like, a user is already halfway across his journey and then you understand what he is trying to achieve and if you have new feature related to it that's the time you show it to him.

For example, you are on a book selling website. You want to buy a new book with different taste. The website has added a new feature to allow users read 10 pages of any book before making up their mind. Whenever a user visits the individual page of a book, a guiding pop up comes on their screen telling about the new feature. Hence helping you on your journey rather than pushing all the 10 features together. You can always add "Learn more" button with every guideline popup.

You can make videos which last about 30sec for each feature. It might take time but if your new features are major ones then this is how you can achieve effective results. Only one more thing regarding this

Play it clear. Keep thumbnails if possible over buttons. Place them just near the headings of the sections and if you are using buttons then go for good UX writing like "Engage better with content in 30 sec" and then a play button can do the trick.

You can also add bottom frames to let your users know that you have made some changes to the website. Just add the button of "Learn more" to that frame, when user will navigate through the frame on that page, it won't really matter if you show the features in a carousel or static information because only interested users will click on it.

Use proper UX writing so that user engages with the bottom frame.

These are great solutions, but not all feasible to deliver in such a short amount of time. This was a last-minute kind of thing that they wanted to add. Basically they are getting cold-feet about whether the redesign will attract more customers. Here at the office we want to avoid a carousel at all costs, but we're running out of arguments not to do it.

@KjelleVe, check out the edit part of the answer, hope it's more useful.

@KjelleVe The caroussel will drive away visitors. Popups like this, like cookie walls, like newsletter-signups 1 second after page load... those all prevent the user from using the page.

carousel client onepager
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<div id="profInfo">
        <div id="profImage">
        <img src="..." alt="user: ..."/>
        </div>
        <div id="profDetails">
            <ul>
                <li><b class="underb" style="color: #7da315;">Name</b><b style="color: #7da315;">:</b> Ilya Knaup </li>
                <li><b class="underb" style="color: #1e8bb4;">Country</b><b style="color: #1e8bb4;">:</b> Spain </li>
                <li><b class="underb" style="color: #c86c1f;">Stories</b><b style="color: #c86c1f;">:</b></li>
                <li><div style="float:left; display:block;width:60px;"><b class="underb" style="color: #af1e83;">About me</b>: </div> <p style="display:block;width:300px;padding-left:60px;">Lorem ipsum dummy textum ... Lorem ipsum dummy textum ... Lorem ipsum dummy textum ... Lorem ipsum dummy textum ...<p></li>
            </ul>
        </div>
        </div>

Of course it would be better to store these updates in your stylesheet as opposed to inline styles but this will show you what needs to be done.

Sorry about that, revision is posted.

How to align text in the following way using css / html? - Stack Overf...

html css positioning alignment
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<div id="profInfo">
        <div id="profImage">
        <img src="..." alt="user: ..."/>
        </div>
        <div id="profDetails">
            <ul>
                <li><b class="underb" style="color: #7da315;">Name</b><b style="color: #7da315;">:</b> Ilya Knaup </li>
                <li><b class="underb" style="color: #1e8bb4;">Country</b><b style="color: #1e8bb4;">:</b> Spain </li>
                <li><b class="underb" style="color: #c86c1f;">Stories</b><b style="color: #c86c1f;">:</b></li>
                <li><div style="float:left; display:block;width:60px;"><b class="underb" style="color: #af1e83;">About me</b>: </div> <p style="display:block;width:300px;padding-left:60px;">Lorem ipsum dummy textum ... Lorem ipsum dummy textum ... Lorem ipsum dummy textum ... Lorem ipsum dummy textum ...<p></li>
            </ul>
        </div>
        </div>

Of course it would be better to store these updates in your stylesheet as opposed to inline styles but this will show you what needs to be done.

Sorry about that, revision is posted.

How to align text in the following way using css / html? - Stack Overf...

html css positioning alignment
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One reason is that we don't have a well-developed pattern for UTDD - User Test Driven Development. Nor have I seen many good examples of mapping User Stories to Unit Tests. Why, for example, do so few tutorials discuss User Stories?

design - Why is UI programming so time consuming, and what can you do ...

design user-interface usability
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From the Testivus posting I think the answer context should be the second programmer. Having said this from a practical point of view we need parameter / goals to strive for. I consider that this can be "tested" in an Agile process by analyzing the code we have the architecture, functionality (user stories), and then come up with a number. Based on my experience in the Telecom area I would say that 60% is a good value to check.

What is a reasonable code coverage % for unit tests (and why)? - Stack...

unit-testing code-coverage code-metrics
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One thing you could look at is using user stories using something like SpecFlow. I 've found that these stories more naturally map to integration tests, which is what you want. The added benefit of using these is it creates a set of almost use cases that could be used by teams that are other than technical (i.e. product manages/business analysts).

c# - Getting started with automated integration/unit testing in an exi...

c# unit-testing nunit mstest xunit.net
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Refer to Hyperlink Mentions of Users in Stories for a detailed explanation of the representation of user links in Asana along with a (possibly still unsupported) manner to get an actual name via the hypertext version of a comment.

Another solution is to map the that person's "Assigned to Me" project URL ID to the Asana user ID that is used in the API. This requires maintenance as additional users are added to Asana.

Thanks. The suggestion in the link you have provided has the answer. Adding a query parameter ('opt_fields=html_text') on the story request REST API call to Asana did provide the text as html with the user name.

comments - Asana Task API Stories only provide hyperlink to Asana User...

hyperlink comments task asana asana-api
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Refer to Hyperlink Mentions of Users in Stories for a detailed explanation of the representation of user links in Asana along with a (possibly still unsupported) manner to get an actual name via the hypertext version of a comment.

Another solution is to map the that person's "Assigned to Me" project URL ID to the Asana user ID that is used in the API. This requires maintenance as additional users are added to Asana.

Thanks. The suggestion in the link you have provided has the answer. Adding a query parameter ('opt_fields=html_text') on the story request REST API call to Asana did provide the text as html with the user name.

comments - Asana Task API Stories only provide hyperlink to Asana User...

hyperlink comments task asana asana-api