Rectangle 27 6

If you're simply trying to resize an image, I'd recommend setting width and height of the image with CSS. Here's a quick example:

.small-image {
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
}

Note that the height and width can also be set using JavaScript. Here's quick code sample:

var img = document.getElement("my-image");
img.style.width = 100 + "px";  // Make sure you add the "px" to the end,
img.style.height = 100 + "px"; // otherwise you'll confuse IE

Also, to ensure that the resized image looks good, add the following css rules to image selector:

  • -ms-interpolation-mode: bicubic: introduce in IE7
  • image-rendering: optimizeQuality: introduced in FireFox 3.6

As far as I can tell, all browsers except IE using an bicubic algorithm to resize images by default, so your resized images should look good in Firefox and Chrome.

If setting the css width and height doesn't work, you may want to play with a css transform:

-moz-transform: scale(sx[, sy])
-webkit-transform:scale(sx[, sy])

If for whatever reason you need to use a canvas, please note that there are two ways an image can be resize: by resizing the canvas with css or by drawing the image at a smaller size.

Neither resizing the canvas nor drawing the image at a smaller size resolves the problem (in Chrome), sadly.

Chrome 27 produces nice resized image, but you can't copy the result to a canvas; attempting to do so will copy the original image instead.

javascript - Resizing an image in an HTML5 canvas - Stack Overflow

javascript html5 canvas image-resizing
Rectangle 27 9

These can be copy/pasted and can be used inside of web workers to resize images (or any other operation that requires interpolation - I'm using them to defish images at the moment).

I haven't added the lanczos stuff above, so feel free to add that as a comparison if you'd like.

javascript - Resizing an image in an HTML5 canvas - Stack Overflow

javascript html5 canvas image-resizing
Rectangle 27 365

So what do you do if all the browsers (actually, Chrome 5 gave me quite good one) won't give you good enough resampling quality? You implement them yourself then! Oh come on, we're entering the new age of Web 3.0, HTML5 compliant browsers, super optimized JIT javascript compilers, multi-core() machines, with tons of memory, what are you afraid of? Hey, there's the word java in javascript, so that should guarantee the performance, right? Behold, the thumbnail generating code:

// returns a function that calculates lanczos weight
function lanczosCreate(lobes) {
    return function(x) {
        if (x > lobes)
            return 0;
        x *= Math.PI;
        if (Math.abs(x) < 1e-16)
            return 1;
        var xx = x / lobes;
        return Math.sin(x) * Math.sin(xx) / x / xx;
    };
}

// elem: canvas element, img: image element, sx: scaled width, lobes: kernel radius
function thumbnailer(elem, img, sx, lobes) {
    this.canvas = elem;
    elem.width = img.width;
    elem.height = img.height;
    elem.style.display = "none";
    this.ctx = elem.getContext("2d");
    this.ctx.drawImage(img, 0, 0);
    this.img = img;
    this.src = this.ctx.getImageData(0, 0, img.width, img.height);
    this.dest = {
        width : sx,
        height : Math.round(img.height * sx / img.width),
    };
    this.dest.data = new Array(this.dest.width * this.dest.height * 3);
    this.lanczos = lanczosCreate(lobes);
    this.ratio = img.width / sx;
    this.rcp_ratio = 2 / this.ratio;
    this.range2 = Math.ceil(this.ratio * lobes / 2);
    this.cacheLanc = {};
    this.center = {};
    this.icenter = {};
    setTimeout(this.process1, 0, this, 0);
}

thumbnailer.prototype.process1 = function(self, u) {
    self.center.x = (u + 0.5) * self.ratio;
    self.icenter.x = Math.floor(self.center.x);
    for (var v = 0; v < self.dest.height; v++) {
        self.center.y = (v + 0.5) * self.ratio;
        self.icenter.y = Math.floor(self.center.y);
        var a, r, g, b;
        a = r = g = b = 0;
        for (var i = self.icenter.x - self.range2; i <= self.icenter.x + self.range2; i++) {
            if (i < 0 || i >= self.src.width)
                continue;
            var f_x = Math.floor(1000 * Math.abs(i - self.center.x));
            if (!self.cacheLanc[f_x])
                self.cacheLanc[f_x] = {};
            for (var j = self.icenter.y - self.range2; j <= self.icenter.y + self.range2; j++) {
                if (j < 0 || j >= self.src.height)
                    continue;
                var f_y = Math.floor(1000 * Math.abs(j - self.center.y));
                if (self.cacheLanc[f_x][f_y] == undefined)
                    self.cacheLanc[f_x][f_y] = self.lanczos(Math.sqrt(Math.pow(f_x * self.rcp_ratio, 2)
                            + Math.pow(f_y * self.rcp_ratio, 2)) / 1000);
                weight = self.cacheLanc[f_x][f_y];
                if (weight > 0) {
                    var idx = (j * self.src.width + i) * 4;
                    a += weight;
                    r += weight * self.src.data[idx];
                    g += weight * self.src.data[idx + 1];
                    b += weight * self.src.data[idx + 2];
                }
            }
        }
        var idx = (v * self.dest.width + u) * 3;
        self.dest.data[idx] = r / a;
        self.dest.data[idx + 1] = g / a;
        self.dest.data[idx + 2] = b / a;
    }

    if (++u < self.dest.width)
        setTimeout(self.process1, 0, self, u);
    else
        setTimeout(self.process2, 0, self);
};
thumbnailer.prototype.process2 = function(self) {
    self.canvas.width = self.dest.width;
    self.canvas.height = self.dest.height;
    self.ctx.drawImage(self.img, 0, 0, self.dest.width, self.dest.height);
    self.src = self.ctx.getImageData(0, 0, self.dest.width, self.dest.height);
    var idx, idx2;
    for (var i = 0; i < self.dest.width; i++) {
        for (var j = 0; j < self.dest.height; j++) {
            idx = (j * self.dest.width + i) * 3;
            idx2 = (j * self.dest.width + i) * 4;
            self.src.data[idx2] = self.dest.data[idx];
            self.src.data[idx2 + 1] = self.dest.data[idx + 1];
            self.src.data[idx2 + 2] = self.dest.data[idx + 2];
        }
    }
    self.ctx.putImageData(self.src, 0, 0);
    self.canvas.style.display = "block";
};

...with which you can produce results like these!

img.onload = function() {
    var canvas = document.createElement("canvas");
    new thumbnailer(canvas, img, 188, 3); //this produces lanczos3
    // but feel free to raise it up to 8. Your client will appreciate
    // that the program makes full use of his machine.
    document.body.appendChild(canvas);
};

I had actually tried implementing it myself, doing as you did, copying code from an open source image editor. Since I wasn't able to find any solid documentation on the algorithm I had a hard time optimizing it. In the end, mine was kind of slow (took a few seconds to resize the image). When I get the chance, I'll try yours out and see if its any faster. And I think webworkers make multi-core javascript possible now. I was going to try using them to speed it up, but I was having trouble figuring out how to make this into a multithreaded algorithm

Sorry, forgot that! I've edited the reply. It's not going to be fast anyways, bicubic should be faster. Not to mention the algorithm I used is not the usual 2-way resizing (which is line by line, horizontal then vertical), so it's a looot slower.

of course, you shouldn't use this code as it is in production app, because the thumbnailer object is never reused and thus will cause memory leak. Please think up of a proper destructor.

You are awesome and deserve tons of awesomeage.

This produces decent results, but takes 7.4 seconds for a 1.8 MP image in the latest version of Chrome...

javascript - Resizing an image in an HTML5 canvas - Stack Overflow

javascript html5 canvas image-resizing
Rectangle 27 10

Dealing with contents when resizing a canvas

If you resize the canvas, the drawn content is always erased. That's how canvas behaves.

You can either redraw the content after resizing or you can save the content as image data and restore after resizing (see canvas.toDataURL).

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="all" href="css/reset.css" /> <!-- reset css -->
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery.min.js"></script>

<style>
    body{ background-color: ivory; padding:10px; }
    canvas{border:1px solid red;}
</style>

<script>
$(function(){

    var canvas=document.getElementById("canvas");
    var ctx=canvas.getContext("2d");

    // draw some content
    ctx.lineWidth=3;
    ctx.fillStyle="blue";
    ctx.strokeStyle="red";
    ctx.rect(50,50,100,50);
    ctx.fill();
    ctx.stroke();
    ctx.font="14px Verdana";
    ctx.fillStyle="white";
    ctx.fillText("Scale Me",65,75);

    function saveResizeAndRedisplay(scaleFactor){

        // save the canvas content as imageURL
        var data=canvas.toDataURL();

        // resize the canvas
        canvas.width*=scaleFactor;
        canvas.height*=scaleFactor;

        // scale and redraw the canvas content
        var img=new Image();
        img.onload=function(){
            ctx.drawImage(img,0,0,img.width,img.height,0,0,canvas.width,canvas.height);
        }
        img.src=data;

    }

    $("#resizer").click(function(){ saveResizeAndRedisplay(1.5); });

}); // end $(function(){});
</script>

</head>

<body>
    <button id="resizer">Click to resize the canvas</button><br/>
    <canvas id="canvas" width=200 height=150></canvas>
</body>
</html>

javascript - HTML5 responsive canvas: resizing the browser canvas draw...

javascript jquery html5 canvas
Rectangle 27 283

The canvas DOM element has .height and .width properties that correspond to the height="" and width="" attributes. Set them to numeric values in JavaScript code to resize your canvas. For example:

var canvas = document.getElementsByTagName('canvas')[0];
canvas.width  = 800;
canvas.height = 600;

Note that this clears the canvas, though you should follow with ctx.clearRect( 0, 0, ctx.canvas.width, ctx.canvas.height); to handle those browsers that don't fully clear the canvas. You'll need to redraw of any content you wanted displayed after the size change.

Note further that the height and width are the logical canvas dimensions used for drawing and are different from the style.height and style.width CSS attributes. If you don't set the CSS attributes, the intrinsic size of the canvas will be used as its display size; if you do set the CSS attributes, and they differ from the canvas dimensions, your content will be scaled in the browser. For example:

// Make a canvas that has a blurry pixelated zoom-in
// with each canvas pixel drawn showing as roughly 2x2 on screen
canvas.width  = 400;
canvas.height = 300; 
canvas.style.width  = '800px';
canvas.style.height = '600px';
var c = document.getElementsByTagName('canvas')[0];
var ctx = c.getContext('2d');
ctx.lineWidth   = 1;
ctx.strokeStyle = '#f00';
ctx.fillStyle   = '#eff';

ctx.fillRect(  10.5, 10.5, 20, 20 );
ctx.strokeRect( 10.5, 10.5, 20, 20 );
ctx.fillRect(   40, 10.5, 20, 20 );
ctx.strokeRect( 40, 10.5, 20, 20 );
ctx.fillRect(   70, 10, 20, 20 );
ctx.strokeRect( 70, 10, 20, 20 );

ctx.strokeStyle = '#fff';
ctx.strokeRect( 10.5, 10.5, 20, 20 );
ctx.strokeRect( 40, 10.5, 20, 20 );
ctx.strokeRect( 70, 10, 20, 20 );
body { background:#eee; margin:1em; text-align:center }
canvas { background:#fff; border:1px solid #ccc; width:400px; height:160px }
<canvas width="100" height="40"></canvas>
<p>Showing that re-drawing the same antialiased lines does not obliterate old antialiased lines.</p>

@Hazaart If you want to set them differently: $('#mycanvas').attr({width:400,height:300}).css({width:'800px',height:'600px'}); If you want to have the visual size be the same as the pixel size, never set the styles, only the attributes.

"If you want to have the visual size be the same as the pixel size, never set the styles, only the attributes", is there a reason for this preference? If I have many objects in the canvas and I want to zoomin/zoomout, it would be much faster to just reset the css, no?(rather than loop through all objects)...

@Gamemorize: zooming via CSS makes it blurry. However, you can zoom via context scaling and translation between redrawing instead of changing the 'size' of each object.

Thx much appreciated. I see now what CSS is doing... it treats the canvas 'like' a image, scaling an image is obviously not as good as 're-drawing' it!

Also, you can now do "clear pixelated zoom-in" instead of "blurry pixelated zoom-in", at least on Chrome, using style "image-rendering:pixelated" on the canvas. I fiddled your fiddle to show the difference: jsfiddle.net/donhatch/9bheb/1663

Canvas width and height in HTML5 - Stack Overflow

html5 canvas
Rectangle 27 12

I'll answer the more general question of how to have a canvas dynamically adapt in size upon window resize. The accepted answer appropriately handles the case where width and height are both supposed to be 100%, which is what was asked for, but which also will change the aspect ratio of the canvas. Many users will want the canvas to resize on window resize, but while keeping the aspect ratio untouched. It's not the exact question, but it "fits in", just putting the question into a slightly more general context.

The window will have some aspect ratio (width / height), and so will the canvas object. How you want these two aspect ratios to relate to each other is one thing you'll have to be clear about, there is no "one size fits all" answer to that question - I'll go through some common cases of what you might want.

Most important thing you have to be clear about: the html canvas object has a width attribute and a height attribute; and then, the css of the same object also has a width and a height attribute. Those two widths and heights are different, both are useful for different things.

Changing the width and height attributes is one method with which you can always change the size of your canvas, but then you'll have to repaint everything, which will take time and is not always necessary, because some amount of size change you can accomplish via the css attributes, in which case you do not redraw the canvas.

I see 4 cases of what you might want to happen on window resize (all starting with a full screen canvas)

1: you want the width to remain 100%, and you want the aspect ratio to stay as it was. In that case, you do not need to redraw the canvas; you don't even need a window resize handler. All you need is

2: you want width and height to both stay 100%, and you want the resulting change in aspect ratio to have the effect of a stretched-out image. Now, you still don't need to redraw the canvas, but you need a window resize handler. In the handler, you do

$(ctx.canvas).css("height", window.innerHeight);

3: you want width and height to both stay 100%, but the answer to the change in aspect ratio is something different from stretching the image. Then you need to redraw, and do it the way that is outlined in the accepted answer.

4: you want the width and height to be 100% on page load, but stay constant thereafter (no reaction to window resize.

All fiddles have identical code, except for line 63 where the mode is set. You can also copy the fiddle code to run on your local machine, in which case you can select the mode via a querystring argument, as ?mode=redraw

$(ctx.canvas).css("width", "100%");
$(canvas).css("width", "100%");

jquery - HTML5 Canvas 100% Width Height of Viewport? - Stack Overflow

jquery html5 canvas viewport
Rectangle 27 12

I'll answer the more general question of how to have a canvas dynamically adapt in size upon window resize. The accepted answer appropriately handles the case where width and height are both supposed to be 100%, which is what was asked for, but which also will change the aspect ratio of the canvas. Many users will want the canvas to resize on window resize, but while keeping the aspect ratio untouched. It's not the exact question, but it "fits in", just putting the question into a slightly more general context.

The window will have some aspect ratio (width / height), and so will the canvas object. How you want these two aspect ratios to relate to each other is one thing you'll have to be clear about, there is no "one size fits all" answer to that question - I'll go through some common cases of what you might want.

Most important thing you have to be clear about: the html canvas object has a width attribute and a height attribute; and then, the css of the same object also has a width and a height attribute. Those two widths and heights are different, both are useful for different things.

Changing the width and height attributes is one method with which you can always change the size of your canvas, but then you'll have to repaint everything, which will take time and is not always necessary, because some amount of size change you can accomplish via the css attributes, in which case you do not redraw the canvas.

I see 4 cases of what you might want to happen on window resize (all starting with a full screen canvas)

1: you want the width to remain 100%, and you want the aspect ratio to stay as it was. In that case, you do not need to redraw the canvas; you don't even need a window resize handler. All you need is

2: you want width and height to both stay 100%, and you want the resulting change in aspect ratio to have the effect of a stretched-out image. Now, you still don't need to redraw the canvas, but you need a window resize handler. In the handler, you do

$(ctx.canvas).css("height", window.innerHeight);

3: you want width and height to both stay 100%, but the answer to the change in aspect ratio is something different from stretching the image. Then you need to redraw, and do it the way that is outlined in the accepted answer.

4: you want the width and height to be 100% on page load, but stay constant thereafter (no reaction to window resize.

All fiddles have identical code, except for line 63 where the mode is set. You can also copy the fiddle code to run on your local machine, in which case you can select the mode via a querystring argument, as ?mode=redraw

$(ctx.canvas).css("width", "100%");
$(canvas).css("width", "100%");

jquery - HTML5 Canvas 100% Width Height of Viewport? - Stack Overflow

jquery html5 canvas viewport
Rectangle 27 35

Fast image resize/resample algorithm using Hermite filter with JavaScript. Support transparency, gives good quality. Preview:

/**
 * Hermite resize - fast image resize/resample using Hermite filter. 1 cpu version!
 * 
 * @param {HtmlElement} canvas
 * @param {int} width
 * @param {int} height
 * @param {boolean} resize_canvas if true, canvas will be resized. Optional.
 */
function resample_single(canvas, width, height, resize_canvas) {
    var width_source = canvas.width;
    var height_source = canvas.height;
    width = Math.round(width);
    height = Math.round(height);

    var ratio_w = width_source / width;
    var ratio_h = height_source / height;
    var ratio_w_half = Math.ceil(ratio_w / 2);
    var ratio_h_half = Math.ceil(ratio_h / 2);

    var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");
    var img = ctx.getImageData(0, 0, width_source, height_source);
    var img2 = ctx.createImageData(width, height);
    var data = img.data;
    var data2 = img2.data;

    for (var j = 0; j < height; j++) {
        for (var i = 0; i < width; i++) {
            var x2 = (i + j * width) * 4;
            var weight = 0;
            var weights = 0;
            var weights_alpha = 0;
            var gx_r = 0;
            var gx_g = 0;
            var gx_b = 0;
            var gx_a = 0;
            var center_y = (j + 0.5) * ratio_h;
            var yy_start = Math.floor(j * ratio_h);
            var yy_stop = Math.ceil((j + 1) * ratio_h);
            for (var yy = yy_start; yy < yy_stop; yy++) {
                var dy = Math.abs(center_y - (yy + 0.5)) / ratio_h_half;
                var center_x = (i + 0.5) * ratio_w;
                var w0 = dy * dy; //pre-calc part of w
                var xx_start = Math.floor(i * ratio_w);
                var xx_stop = Math.ceil((i + 1) * ratio_w);
                for (var xx = xx_start; xx < xx_stop; xx++) {
                    var dx = Math.abs(center_x - (xx + 0.5)) / ratio_w_half;
                    var w = Math.sqrt(w0 + dx * dx);
                    if (w >= 1) {
                        //pixel too far
                        continue;
                    }
                    //hermite filter
                    weight = 2 * w * w * w - 3 * w * w + 1;
                    var pos_x = 4 * (xx + yy * width_source);
                    //alpha
                    gx_a += weight * data[pos_x + 3];
                    weights_alpha += weight;
                    //colors
                    if (data[pos_x + 3] < 255)
                        weight = weight * data[pos_x + 3] / 250;
                    gx_r += weight * data[pos_x];
                    gx_g += weight * data[pos_x + 1];
                    gx_b += weight * data[pos_x + 2];
                    weights += weight;
                }
            }
            data2[x2] = gx_r / weights;
            data2[x2 + 1] = gx_g / weights;
            data2[x2 + 2] = gx_b / weights;
            data2[x2 + 3] = gx_a / weights_alpha;
        }
    }
    //clear and resize canvas
    if (resize_canvas === true) {
        canvas.width = width;
        canvas.height = height;
    } else {
        ctx.clearRect(0, 0, width_source, height_source);
    }

    //draw
    ctx.putImageData(img2, 0, 0);
}

Will you also share the webworkers version as well? Probably due to setup overhead, it's slower for small images, but it could be useful for larger source images.

added demo, git links, also multi-core version. Btw i did not spend too much time on optimizing multicore version... Single version i believe is optimized well.

Huge difference and decent performance. Thank you very much! before and after

@ViliusL Ah now I remembered why web workers didn't work so well. They didn't have shared memory before, and still doesn't have it now! Maybe someday when they manage to sort it out, your code will come to use (that, or maybe people use PNaCl instead)

javascript - Resizing an image in an HTML5 canvas - Stack Overflow

javascript html5 canvas image-resizing
Rectangle 27 14

To ensure that resizing is done proportinatly, you can simply add the following properties to your image object:

lockUniScaling: true

I will typically want the image to scale from the center, and thus set this as well:

centeredScaling: true

To "crop" the image however; this takes more effort as this isn't a default functionality offered by Fabric JS. I've done a fair bit of work around this and have yet to come up with a bullet-proof solution that works for text, images, rectangles, polygons, circles, rotation angles, etc.

The basis behind this is to create two elements - one being your image, and the second being your clipping mask (a shape typically, such as a rectangle, polygon, etc.) than then is applied as the clipTo property to your image element. This solution is covered in: Multiple clipping areas on Fabric.js canvas

javascript - How to maintain the aspect ratio while scaling the image ...

javascript image html5-canvas fabricjs
Rectangle 27 14

Try pica - that's a highly optimized resizer with selectable algorythms. See demo.

For example, original image from first post is resized in 120ms with Lanczos filter and 3px window or 60ms with Box filter and 0.5px window. For huge 17mb image 5000x3000px resize takes ~1s on desktop and 3s on mobile.

All resize principles were described very well in this thread, and pica does not add rocket science. But it's optimized very well for modern JIT-s, and is ready to use out of box (via npm or bower). Also, it use webworkers when available to avoid interface freezes.

I also plan to add unsharp mask support soon, because it's very useful after downscale.

javascript - Resizing an image in an HTML5 canvas - Stack Overflow

javascript html5 canvas image-resizing
Rectangle 27 13

I know this is an old thread but it might be useful for some people such as myself that months after are hitting this issue for the first time.

Here is some code that resizes the image every time you reload the image. I am aware this is not optimal at all, but I provide it as a proof of concept.

Also, sorry for using jQuery for simple selectors but I just feel too comfortable with the syntax.

$(document).on('ready', createImage);
$(window).on('resize', createImage);

var createImage = function(){
  var canvas = document.getElementById('myCanvas');
  canvas.width = window.innerWidth || $(window).width();
  canvas.height = window.innerHeight || $(window).height();
  var ctx = canvas.getContext('2d');
  img = new Image();
  img.addEventListener('load', function () {
    ctx.drawImage(this, 0, 0, w, h);
  });
  img.src = 'http://www.ruinvalor.com/Telanor/images/original.jpg';
};
html, body{
  height: 100%;
  width: 100%;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  background: #000;
}
canvas{
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  top: 0;
  z-index: 0;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<html>
  <head>
    <meta charset="utf-8" />
    <title>Canvas Resize</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <canvas id="myCanvas"></canvas>
  </body>
</html>

My createImage function is called once when the document is loaded and after that it is called every time the window receives a resize event.

I tested it in Chrome 6 and Firefox 3.6, both on the Mac. This "technique" eats processor as it if was ice cream in the summer, but it does the trick.

javascript - Resizing an image in an HTML5 canvas - Stack Overflow

javascript html5 canvas image-resizing
Rectangle 27 6

I'd highly suggest you check out this link and make sure it is set to true.

Gecko 1.9.2 introduced the mozImageSmoothingEnabled property to the canvas element; if this Boolean value is false, images won't be smoothed when scaled. This property is true by default. view plainprint?

javascript - Resizing an image in an HTML5 canvas - Stack Overflow

javascript html5 canvas image-resizing
Rectangle 27 6

This is a javascript function adapted from @Telanor's code. When passing a image base64 as first argument to the function, it returns the base64 of the resized image. maxWidth and maxHeight are optional.

function thumbnail(base64, maxWidth, maxHeight) {

  // Max size for thumbnail
  if(typeof(maxWidth) === 'undefined') var maxWidth = 500;
  if(typeof(maxHeight) === 'undefined') var maxHeight = 500;

  // Create and initialize two canvas
  var canvas = document.createElement("canvas");
  var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");
  var canvasCopy = document.createElement("canvas");
  var copyContext = canvasCopy.getContext("2d");

  // Create original image
  var img = new Image();
  img.src = base64;

  // Determine new ratio based on max size
  var ratio = 1;
  if(img.width > maxWidth)
    ratio = maxWidth / img.width;
  else if(img.height > maxHeight)
    ratio = maxHeight / img.height;

  // Draw original image in second canvas
  canvasCopy.width = img.width;
  canvasCopy.height = img.height;
  copyContext.drawImage(img, 0, 0);

  // Copy and resize second canvas to first canvas
  canvas.width = img.width * ratio;
  canvas.height = img.height * ratio;
  ctx.drawImage(canvasCopy, 0, 0, canvasCopy.width, canvasCopy.height, 0, 0, canvas.width, canvas.height);

  return canvas.toDataURL();

}

your approach is very fast but it produces a fuzzy image as you can see here: stackoverflow.com/questions/18922880/

javascript - Resizing an image in an HTML5 canvas - Stack Overflow

javascript html5 canvas image-resizing
Rectangle 27 20

Basically what you have to do is to bind the onresize event to your body, once you catch the event you just need to resize the canvas using window.innerWidth and window.innerHeight.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <title>Canvas Resize</title>

    <script type="text/javascript">
        function resize_canvas(){
            canvas = document.getElementById("canvas");
            if (canvas.width  < window.innerWidth)
            {
                canvas.width  = window.innerWidth;
            }

            if (canvas.height < window.innerHeight)
            {
                canvas.height = window.innerHeight;
            }
        }
    </script>
</head>

<body onresize="resize_canvas()">
        <canvas id="canvas">Your browser doesn't support canvas</canvas>
</body>
</html>

You could just use an event listener.

This has margins and shows scrollbars, plus you have to resize the screen before it does anything.

What if the canvas is larger than the viewport (when making the viewport narrower or shorter)? This solution does not seem to handle that.

@ArtOfWarfare original questions don't mention anything about styles. But you can stylize it with css and remove margins and hide scroll bars if you like. And you simply can add ` <body onload="resize_canvas()">` then when page load then resize canvas.

@LayZee original question saya bout scale the canvas to fit the page, not a viewport. That's can be another question.

javascript - Resize HTML5 canvas to fit window - Stack Overflow

javascript html5 canvas
Rectangle 27 20

Basically what you have to do is to bind the onresize event to your body, once you catch the event you just need to resize the canvas using window.innerWidth and window.innerHeight.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <title>Canvas Resize</title>

    <script type="text/javascript">
        function resize_canvas(){
            canvas = document.getElementById("canvas");
            if (canvas.width  < window.innerWidth)
            {
                canvas.width  = window.innerWidth;
            }

            if (canvas.height < window.innerHeight)
            {
                canvas.height = window.innerHeight;
            }
        }
    </script>
</head>

<body onresize="resize_canvas()">
        <canvas id="canvas">Your browser doesn't support canvas</canvas>
</body>
</html>

You could just use an event listener.

This has margins and shows scrollbars, plus you have to resize the screen before it does anything.

What if the canvas is larger than the viewport (when making the viewport narrower or shorter)? This solution does not seem to handle that.

@ArtOfWarfare original questions don't mention anything about styles. But you can stylize it with css and remove margins and hide scroll bars if you like. And you simply can add ` <body onload="resize_canvas()">` then when page load then resize canvas.

@LayZee original question saya bout scale the canvas to fit the page, not a viewport. That's can be another question.

javascript - Resize HTML5 canvas to fit window - Stack Overflow

javascript html5 canvas
Rectangle 27 18

Setting the canvas coordinate space width and height based on the browser client's dimensions requires you to resize and redraw whenever the browser is resized.

A less convoluted solution is to maintain the drawable dimensions in Javascript variables, but set the canvas dimensions based on the screen.width, screen.height dimensions. Use CSS to fit:

#containingDiv { 
  overflow: hidden;
}
#myCanvas {
  position: absolute; 
  top: 0px;
  left: 0px;
}

The browser window generally won't ever be larger than the screen itself (except where the screen resolution is misreported, as it could be with non-matching dual monitors), so the background won't show and pixel proportions won't vary. The canvas pixels will be directly proportional to the screen resolution unless you use CSS to scale the canvas.

Rescaling canvas with CSS is troublesome. At least on Chrome and Safari, mouse/touch event positions will not correspond 1:1 with canvas pixel positions, and you'll have to transform the coordinate systems.

javascript - Resize HTML5 canvas to fit window - Stack Overflow

javascript html5 canvas
Rectangle 27 18

Setting the canvas coordinate space width and height based on the browser client's dimensions requires you to resize and redraw whenever the browser is resized.

A less convoluted solution is to maintain the drawable dimensions in Javascript variables, but set the canvas dimensions based on the screen.width, screen.height dimensions. Use CSS to fit:

#containingDiv { 
  overflow: hidden;
}
#myCanvas {
  position: absolute; 
  top: 0px;
  left: 0px;
}

The browser window generally won't ever be larger than the screen itself (except where the screen resolution is misreported, as it could be with non-matching dual monitors), so the background won't show and pixel proportions won't vary. The canvas pixels will be directly proportional to the screen resolution unless you use CSS to scale the canvas.

Rescaling canvas with CSS is troublesome. At least on Chrome and Safari, mouse/touch event positions will not correspond 1:1 with canvas pixel positions, and you'll have to transform the coordinate systems.

javascript - Resize HTML5 canvas to fit window - Stack Overflow

javascript html5 canvas
Rectangle 27 4

function resize2(i) {
      var cc = document.createElement("canvas");
      cc.width = i.width / 2;
      cc.height = i.height / 2;
      var ctx = cc.getContext("2d");
      ctx.drawImage(i, 0, 0, cc.width, cc.height);
      return cc;
    }
    var cc = img;
    while (cc.width > 64 * 2) {
      cc = resize2(cc);
    }
    // .. than drawImage(cc, .... )

javascript - Resizing an image in an HTML5 canvas - Stack Overflow

javascript html5 canvas image-resizing
Rectangle 27 1

Without knowing the specifics of your final application, I would recommend avoiding animation of the canvas size if you can. As you probably know, if you change the size of a canvas element, everything stored on it is wiped clean. This means that animating the dimensions requires you to adjust the width and/or height incrementally while re-drawing the entire canvas at each iteration. For a desktop, this probably isn't a huge issue. Mobile devices will struggle, though.

Instead, I would suggest that you fake the animation by increasing the size of a container element (with a border, background color, etc. so the animation is apparent). Then, when the animation is done, save your current canvas data to a temporary object, increase the size of your canvas, and stamp the old content back on it.

If you are looking to animate the canvas dimensions to reveal content that is already present on a larger theoretical canvas (i.e. the user has a small window that's cropping the full canvas), you would be better off playing with your CSS width and height along with the overflow: hidden; property. With this approach you would be editing your full canvas during all draw operations, but animating the size of your viewport would be simple and smooth.

I agree that redrawing on every frame demands high performance, which is exactly what the internal function does. Is there any way to do it manually, without redrawing, such as stretching (CSS-like) and then redrawing when the animation is done? A CSS solution, perhaps?

@Zar You could definitely do that, but your canvas will look distorted (blurry) during the animation if you're enlarging it. You can edit the CSS width and height properties of your canvas element without wiping your data--it will just stretch the content. When the animation has finished, just create a temporary canvas in memory with the new dimensions and re-draw your content on it. Then swap the old stretched one out for the new one.

Exactly what I'm looking for, but that doesn't work using the KineticJS. Changing the CSS doesn't alter the canvas at all, strangely enough. I'll post a fiddle shortly.

@Zar I've never worked with KineticJS before. Can you get access to the actual canvas object that the framework is manipulating? If so, you can directly modify the CSS width and height.

javascript - Animate resize of HTML5 canvas created by KineticJS frame...

javascript html5 animation canvas kineticjs
Rectangle 27 3

i got this image by right clicking the canvas element in firefox and saving as.

var img = new Image();
img.onload = function () {
    console.debug(this.width,this.height);
    var canvas = document.createElement('canvas'), ctx;
    canvas.width = 188;
    canvas.height = 150;
    document.body.appendChild(canvas);
    ctx = canvas.getContext('2d');
    ctx.drawImage(img,0,0,188,150);
};
img.src = 'original.jpg';
var img = new Image();
// added cause it wasnt defined
var canvas = document.createElement("canvas");
document.body.appendChild(canvas);

var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");
var canvasCopy = document.createElement("canvas");
// adding it to the body

document.body.appendChild(canvasCopy);

var copyContext = canvasCopy.getContext("2d");

img.onload = function()
{
        var ratio = 1;

        // defining cause it wasnt
        var maxWidth = 188,
            maxHeight = 150;

        if(img.width > maxWidth)
                ratio = maxWidth / img.width;
        else if(img.height > maxHeight)
                ratio = maxHeight / img.height;

        canvasCopy.width = img.width;
        canvasCopy.height = img.height;
        copyContext.drawImage(img, 0, 0);

        canvas.width = img.width * ratio;
        canvas.height = img.height * ratio;
        // the line to change
        // ctx.drawImage(canvasCopy, 0, 0, canvasCopy.width, canvasCopy.height, 0, 0, canvas.width, canvas.height);
        // the method signature you are using is for slicing
        ctx.drawImage(canvasCopy, 0, 0, canvas.width, canvas.height);
};

// changed for example
img.src = 'original.jpg';

I've tried doing what you did and its not coming out nice like yours. Unless I missed something, the only change you made was to use the scaling method signature instead of the slicing one, right? For some reason its not working for me.

javascript - Resizing an image in an HTML5 canvas - Stack Overflow

javascript html5 canvas image-resizing