Rectangle 27 10

I wrote a simple module that automates the job of importing/including module scripts in JavaScript. For detailed explanation of the code, refer to the blog post JavaScript require / import / include modules.

// ----- USAGE -----

require('ivar.util.string');
require('ivar.net.*');
require('ivar/util/array.js');
require('http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.1/jquery.min.js');

ready(function(){
    //Do something when required scripts are loaded
});

    //--------------------

var _rmod = _rmod || {}; //Require module namespace
_rmod.LOADED = false;
_rmod.on_ready_fn_stack = [];
_rmod.libpath = '';
_rmod.imported = {};
_rmod.loading = {
    scripts: {},
    length: 0
};

_rmod.findScriptPath = function(script_name) {
    var script_elems = document.getElementsByTagName('script');
    for (var i = 0; i < script_elems.length; i++) {
        if (script_elems[i].src.endsWith(script_name)) {
            var href = window.location.href;
            href = href.substring(0, href.lastIndexOf('/'));
            var url = script_elems[i].src.substring(0, script_elems[i].length - script_name.length);
            return url.substring(href.length+1, url.length);
        }
    }
    return '';
};

_rmod.libpath = _rmod.findScriptPath('script.js'); //Path of your main script used to mark
                                                   //the root directory of your library, any library.


_rmod.injectScript = function(script_name, uri, callback, prepare) {

    if(!prepare)
        prepare(script_name, uri);

    var script_elem = document.createElement('script');
    script_elem.type = 'text/javascript';
    script_elem.title = script_name;
    script_elem.src = uri;
    script_elem.async = true;
    script_elem.defer = false;

    if(!callback)
        script_elem.onload = function() {
            callback(script_name, uri);
        };
    document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild(script_elem);
};

_rmod.requirePrepare = function(script_name, uri) {
    _rmod.loading.scripts[script_name] = uri;
    _rmod.loading.length++;
};

_rmod.requireCallback = function(script_name, uri) {
    _rmod.loading.length--;
    delete _rmod.loading.scripts[script_name];
    _rmod.imported[script_name] = uri;

    if(_rmod.loading.length == 0)
        _rmod.onReady();
};

_rmod.onReady = function() {
    if (!_rmod.LOADED) {
        for (var i = 0; i < _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack.length; i++){
            _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack[i]();
        });
        _rmod.LOADED = true;
    }
};

_.rmod = namespaceToUri = function(script_name, url) {
    var np = script_name.split('.');
    if (np.getLast() === '*') {
        np.pop();
        np.push('_all');
    }

    if(!url)
        url = '';

    script_name = np.join('.');
    return  url + np.join('/')+'.js';
};

//You can rename based on your liking. I chose require, but it
//can be called include or anything else that is easy for you
//to remember or write, except "import", because it is reserved
//for future use.
var require = function(script_name) {
    var uri = '';
    if (script_name.indexOf('/') > -1) {
        uri = script_name;
        var lastSlash = uri.lastIndexOf('/');
        script_name = uri.substring(lastSlash+1, uri.length);
    } 
    else {
        uri = _rmod.namespaceToUri(script_name, ivar._private.libpath);
    }

    if (!_rmod.loading.scripts.hasOwnProperty(script_name)
     && !_rmod.imported.hasOwnProperty(script_name)) {
        _rmod.injectScript(script_name, uri,
            _rmod.requireCallback,
                _rmod.requirePrepare);
    }
};

var ready = function(fn) {
    _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack.push(fn);
};

How do I include a JavaScript file in another JavaScript file? - Stack...

javascript file import include
Rectangle 27 10

I wrote a simple module that automates the job of importing/including module scripts in JavaScript. For detailed explanation of the code, refer to the blog post JavaScript require / import / include modules.

// ----- USAGE -----

require('ivar.util.string');
require('ivar.net.*');
require('ivar/util/array.js');
require('http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.1/jquery.min.js');

ready(function(){
    //Do something when required scripts are loaded
});

    //--------------------

var _rmod = _rmod || {}; //Require module namespace
_rmod.LOADED = false;
_rmod.on_ready_fn_stack = [];
_rmod.libpath = '';
_rmod.imported = {};
_rmod.loading = {
    scripts: {},
    length: 0
};

_rmod.findScriptPath = function(script_name) {
    var script_elems = document.getElementsByTagName('script');
    for (var i = 0; i < script_elems.length; i++) {
        if (script_elems[i].src.endsWith(script_name)) {
            var href = window.location.href;
            href = href.substring(0, href.lastIndexOf('/'));
            var url = script_elems[i].src.substring(0, script_elems[i].length - script_name.length);
            return url.substring(href.length+1, url.length);
        }
    }
    return '';
};

_rmod.libpath = _rmod.findScriptPath('script.js'); //Path of your main script used to mark
                                                   //the root directory of your library, any library.


_rmod.injectScript = function(script_name, uri, callback, prepare) {

    if(!prepare)
        prepare(script_name, uri);

    var script_elem = document.createElement('script');
    script_elem.type = 'text/javascript';
    script_elem.title = script_name;
    script_elem.src = uri;
    script_elem.async = true;
    script_elem.defer = false;

    if(!callback)
        script_elem.onload = function() {
            callback(script_name, uri);
        };
    document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild(script_elem);
};

_rmod.requirePrepare = function(script_name, uri) {
    _rmod.loading.scripts[script_name] = uri;
    _rmod.loading.length++;
};

_rmod.requireCallback = function(script_name, uri) {
    _rmod.loading.length--;
    delete _rmod.loading.scripts[script_name];
    _rmod.imported[script_name] = uri;

    if(_rmod.loading.length == 0)
        _rmod.onReady();
};

_rmod.onReady = function() {
    if (!_rmod.LOADED) {
        for (var i = 0; i < _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack.length; i++){
            _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack[i]();
        });
        _rmod.LOADED = true;
    }
};

_.rmod = namespaceToUri = function(script_name, url) {
    var np = script_name.split('.');
    if (np.getLast() === '*') {
        np.pop();
        np.push('_all');
    }

    if(!url)
        url = '';

    script_name = np.join('.');
    return  url + np.join('/')+'.js';
};

//You can rename based on your liking. I chose require, but it
//can be called include or anything else that is easy for you
//to remember or write, except "import", because it is reserved
//for future use.
var require = function(script_name) {
    var uri = '';
    if (script_name.indexOf('/') > -1) {
        uri = script_name;
        var lastSlash = uri.lastIndexOf('/');
        script_name = uri.substring(lastSlash+1, uri.length);
    } 
    else {
        uri = _rmod.namespaceToUri(script_name, ivar._private.libpath);
    }

    if (!_rmod.loading.scripts.hasOwnProperty(script_name)
     && !_rmod.imported.hasOwnProperty(script_name)) {
        _rmod.injectScript(script_name, uri,
            _rmod.requireCallback,
                _rmod.requirePrepare);
    }
};

var ready = function(fn) {
    _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack.push(fn);
};

How do I include a JavaScript file in another JavaScript file? - Stack...

javascript file import include
Rectangle 27 10

I wrote a simple module that automates the job of importing/including module scripts in JavaScript. For detailed explanation of the code, refer to the blog post JavaScript require / import / include modules.

// ----- USAGE -----

require('ivar.util.string');
require('ivar.net.*');
require('ivar/util/array.js');
require('http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.1/jquery.min.js');

ready(function(){
    //Do something when required scripts are loaded
});

    //--------------------

var _rmod = _rmod || {}; //Require module namespace
_rmod.LOADED = false;
_rmod.on_ready_fn_stack = [];
_rmod.libpath = '';
_rmod.imported = {};
_rmod.loading = {
    scripts: {},
    length: 0
};

_rmod.findScriptPath = function(script_name) {
    var script_elems = document.getElementsByTagName('script');
    for (var i = 0; i < script_elems.length; i++) {
        if (script_elems[i].src.endsWith(script_name)) {
            var href = window.location.href;
            href = href.substring(0, href.lastIndexOf('/'));
            var url = script_elems[i].src.substring(0, script_elems[i].length - script_name.length);
            return url.substring(href.length+1, url.length);
        }
    }
    return '';
};

_rmod.libpath = _rmod.findScriptPath('script.js'); //Path of your main script used to mark
                                                   //the root directory of your library, any library.


_rmod.injectScript = function(script_name, uri, callback, prepare) {

    if(!prepare)
        prepare(script_name, uri);

    var script_elem = document.createElement('script');
    script_elem.type = 'text/javascript';
    script_elem.title = script_name;
    script_elem.src = uri;
    script_elem.async = true;
    script_elem.defer = false;

    if(!callback)
        script_elem.onload = function() {
            callback(script_name, uri);
        };
    document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild(script_elem);
};

_rmod.requirePrepare = function(script_name, uri) {
    _rmod.loading.scripts[script_name] = uri;
    _rmod.loading.length++;
};

_rmod.requireCallback = function(script_name, uri) {
    _rmod.loading.length--;
    delete _rmod.loading.scripts[script_name];
    _rmod.imported[script_name] = uri;

    if(_rmod.loading.length == 0)
        _rmod.onReady();
};

_rmod.onReady = function() {
    if (!_rmod.LOADED) {
        for (var i = 0; i < _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack.length; i++){
            _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack[i]();
        });
        _rmod.LOADED = true;
    }
};

_.rmod = namespaceToUri = function(script_name, url) {
    var np = script_name.split('.');
    if (np.getLast() === '*') {
        np.pop();
        np.push('_all');
    }

    if(!url)
        url = '';

    script_name = np.join('.');
    return  url + np.join('/')+'.js';
};

//You can rename based on your liking. I chose require, but it
//can be called include or anything else that is easy for you
//to remember or write, except "import", because it is reserved
//for future use.
var require = function(script_name) {
    var uri = '';
    if (script_name.indexOf('/') > -1) {
        uri = script_name;
        var lastSlash = uri.lastIndexOf('/');
        script_name = uri.substring(lastSlash+1, uri.length);
    } 
    else {
        uri = _rmod.namespaceToUri(script_name, ivar._private.libpath);
    }

    if (!_rmod.loading.scripts.hasOwnProperty(script_name)
     && !_rmod.imported.hasOwnProperty(script_name)) {
        _rmod.injectScript(script_name, uri,
            _rmod.requireCallback,
                _rmod.requirePrepare);
    }
};

var ready = function(fn) {
    _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack.push(fn);
};

How do I include a JavaScript file in another JavaScript file? - Stack...

javascript file import include
Rectangle 27 10

I wrote a simple module that automates the job of importing/including module scripts in JavaScript. For detailed explanation of the code, refer to the blog post JavaScript require / import / include modules.

// ----- USAGE -----

require('ivar.util.string');
require('ivar.net.*');
require('ivar/util/array.js');
require('http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.1/jquery.min.js');

ready(function(){
    //Do something when required scripts are loaded
});

    //--------------------

var _rmod = _rmod || {}; //Require module namespace
_rmod.LOADED = false;
_rmod.on_ready_fn_stack = [];
_rmod.libpath = '';
_rmod.imported = {};
_rmod.loading = {
    scripts: {},
    length: 0
};

_rmod.findScriptPath = function(script_name) {
    var script_elems = document.getElementsByTagName('script');
    for (var i = 0; i < script_elems.length; i++) {
        if (script_elems[i].src.endsWith(script_name)) {
            var href = window.location.href;
            href = href.substring(0, href.lastIndexOf('/'));
            var url = script_elems[i].src.substring(0, script_elems[i].length - script_name.length);
            return url.substring(href.length+1, url.length);
        }
    }
    return '';
};

_rmod.libpath = _rmod.findScriptPath('script.js'); //Path of your main script used to mark
                                                   //the root directory of your library, any library.


_rmod.injectScript = function(script_name, uri, callback, prepare) {

    if(!prepare)
        prepare(script_name, uri);

    var script_elem = document.createElement('script');
    script_elem.type = 'text/javascript';
    script_elem.title = script_name;
    script_elem.src = uri;
    script_elem.async = true;
    script_elem.defer = false;

    if(!callback)
        script_elem.onload = function() {
            callback(script_name, uri);
        };
    document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild(script_elem);
};

_rmod.requirePrepare = function(script_name, uri) {
    _rmod.loading.scripts[script_name] = uri;
    _rmod.loading.length++;
};

_rmod.requireCallback = function(script_name, uri) {
    _rmod.loading.length--;
    delete _rmod.loading.scripts[script_name];
    _rmod.imported[script_name] = uri;

    if(_rmod.loading.length == 0)
        _rmod.onReady();
};

_rmod.onReady = function() {
    if (!_rmod.LOADED) {
        for (var i = 0; i < _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack.length; i++){
            _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack[i]();
        });
        _rmod.LOADED = true;
    }
};

_.rmod = namespaceToUri = function(script_name, url) {
    var np = script_name.split('.');
    if (np.getLast() === '*') {
        np.pop();
        np.push('_all');
    }

    if(!url)
        url = '';

    script_name = np.join('.');
    return  url + np.join('/')+'.js';
};

//You can rename based on your liking. I chose require, but it
//can be called include or anything else that is easy for you
//to remember or write, except "import", because it is reserved
//for future use.
var require = function(script_name) {
    var uri = '';
    if (script_name.indexOf('/') > -1) {
        uri = script_name;
        var lastSlash = uri.lastIndexOf('/');
        script_name = uri.substring(lastSlash+1, uri.length);
    } 
    else {
        uri = _rmod.namespaceToUri(script_name, ivar._private.libpath);
    }

    if (!_rmod.loading.scripts.hasOwnProperty(script_name)
     && !_rmod.imported.hasOwnProperty(script_name)) {
        _rmod.injectScript(script_name, uri,
            _rmod.requireCallback,
                _rmod.requirePrepare);
    }
};

var ready = function(fn) {
    _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack.push(fn);
};

How do I include a JavaScript file in another JavaScript file? - Stack...

javascript file import include
Rectangle 27 16

You can also check for the PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE environment variable.

private int GetOSArchitecture()
{
    string pa = 
        Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE");
    return ((String.IsNullOrEmpty(pa) || 
             String.Compare(pa, 0, "x86", 0, 3, true) == 0) ? 32 : 64);
}

Just because you have a 64 bit processor doesn't meant you have a 64 bit os

@David This reports the processor architecture of Windows; not the CPU. See detailed explanation starting at "The Code" on this page: andrewensley.com/2009/06/c-detect-windows-os-part-1

c# - How to detect Windows 64-bit platform with .NET? - Stack Overflow

c# windows 64bit .net-2.0 platform-detection
Rectangle 27 1

I wrote a simple module that automatizes the job of importing/including module scripts in JavaScript. Give it a try and please spare some feedback! :) For detailed explanation of the code refer to this blog post: http://stamat.wordpress.com/2013/04/12/javascript-require-import-include-modules/

var _rmod = _rmod || {}; //require module namespace
_rmod.on_ready_fn_stack = [];
_rmod.libpath = '';
_rmod.imported = {};
_rmod.loading = {
    scripts: {},
    length: 0
};

_rmod.findScriptPath = function(script_name) {
    var script_elems = document.getElementsByTagName('script');
    for (var i = 0; i < script_elems.length; i++) {
        if (script_elems[i].src.endsWith(script_name)) {
            var href = window.location.href;
            href = href.substring(0, href.lastIndexOf('/'));
            var url = script_elems[i].src.substring(0, script_elems[i].length - script_name.length);
            return url.substring(href.length+1, url.length);
        }
    }
    return '';
};

_rmod.libpath = _rmod.findScriptPath('script.js'); //Path of your main script used to mark the root directory of your library, any library


_rmod.injectScript = function(script_name, uri, callback, prepare) {

    if(!prepare)
        prepare(script_name, uri);

    var script_elem = document.createElement('script');
    script_elem.type = 'text/javascript';
    script_elem.title = script_name;
    script_elem.src = uri;
    script_elem.async = true;
    script_elem.defer = false;

    if(!callback)
        script_elem.onload = function() {
            callback(script_name, uri);
        };

    document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild(script_elem);
};

_rmod.requirePrepare = function(script_name, uri) {
    _rmod.loading.scripts[script_name] = uri;
    _rmod.loading.length++;
};

_rmod.requireCallback = function(script_name, uri) {
    _rmod.loading.length--;
    delete _rmod.loading.scripts[script_name];
    _rmod.imported[script_name] = uri;

    if(_rmod.loading.length == 0)
        _rmod.onReady();
};

_rmod.onReady = function() {
    if (!_rmod.LOADED) {
        for (var i = 0; i < _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack.length; i++){
            _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack[i]();
        });
        _rmod.LOADED = true;
    }
};

//you can rename based on your liking. I chose require, but it can be called include or anything else that is easy for you to remember or write, except import because it is reserved for future use.
var require = function(script_name) {
    var np = script_name.split('.');
    if (np[np.length-1] === '*') {
        np.pop();
        np.push('_all');
    }

    script_name = np.join('.');
    var uri = _rmod.libpath + np.join('/')+'.js';
    if (!_rmod.loading.scripts.hasOwnProperty(script_name) 
     && !_rmod.imported.hasOwnProperty(script_name)) {
        _rmod.injectScript(script_name, uri, 
            _rmod.requireCallback, 
                _rmod.requirePrepare);
    }
};

var ready = function(fn) {
    _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack.push(fn);
};

// ----- USAGE -----

require('ivar.util.array');
require('ivar.util.string');
require('ivar.net.*');

ready(function(){
    //do something when required scripts are loaded
});

Dynamically load a JavaScript file - Stack Overflow

javascript file import include
Rectangle 27 1

I wrote a simple module that automatizes the job of importing/including module scripts in JavaScript. Give it a try and please spare some feedback! :) For detailed explanation of the code refer to this blog post: http://stamat.wordpress.com/2013/04/12/javascript-require-import-include-modules/

var _rmod = _rmod || {}; //require module namespace
_rmod.on_ready_fn_stack = [];
_rmod.libpath = '';
_rmod.imported = {};
_rmod.loading = {
    scripts: {},
    length: 0
};

_rmod.findScriptPath = function(script_name) {
    var script_elems = document.getElementsByTagName('script');
    for (var i = 0; i < script_elems.length; i++) {
        if (script_elems[i].src.endsWith(script_name)) {
            var href = window.location.href;
            href = href.substring(0, href.lastIndexOf('/'));
            var url = script_elems[i].src.substring(0, script_elems[i].length - script_name.length);
            return url.substring(href.length+1, url.length);
        }
    }
    return '';
};

_rmod.libpath = _rmod.findScriptPath('script.js'); //Path of your main script used to mark the root directory of your library, any library


_rmod.injectScript = function(script_name, uri, callback, prepare) {

    if(!prepare)
        prepare(script_name, uri);

    var script_elem = document.createElement('script');
    script_elem.type = 'text/javascript';
    script_elem.title = script_name;
    script_elem.src = uri;
    script_elem.async = true;
    script_elem.defer = false;

    if(!callback)
        script_elem.onload = function() {
            callback(script_name, uri);
        };

    document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild(script_elem);
};

_rmod.requirePrepare = function(script_name, uri) {
    _rmod.loading.scripts[script_name] = uri;
    _rmod.loading.length++;
};

_rmod.requireCallback = function(script_name, uri) {
    _rmod.loading.length--;
    delete _rmod.loading.scripts[script_name];
    _rmod.imported[script_name] = uri;

    if(_rmod.loading.length == 0)
        _rmod.onReady();
};

_rmod.onReady = function() {
    if (!_rmod.LOADED) {
        for (var i = 0; i < _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack.length; i++){
            _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack[i]();
        });
        _rmod.LOADED = true;
    }
};

//you can rename based on your liking. I chose require, but it can be called include or anything else that is easy for you to remember or write, except import because it is reserved for future use.
var require = function(script_name) {
    var np = script_name.split('.');
    if (np[np.length-1] === '*') {
        np.pop();
        np.push('_all');
    }

    script_name = np.join('.');
    var uri = _rmod.libpath + np.join('/')+'.js';
    if (!_rmod.loading.scripts.hasOwnProperty(script_name) 
     && !_rmod.imported.hasOwnProperty(script_name)) {
        _rmod.injectScript(script_name, uri, 
            _rmod.requireCallback, 
                _rmod.requirePrepare);
    }
};

var ready = function(fn) {
    _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack.push(fn);
};

// ----- USAGE -----

require('ivar.util.array');
require('ivar.util.string');
require('ivar.net.*');

ready(function(){
    //do something when required scripts are loaded
});

Dynamically load a JavaScript file - Stack Overflow

javascript file import include
Rectangle 27 1

This link (https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/generating-pdfs-with-php--pre-10944) shows how to create a form that a user will fill out and then subsequently create a pdf file from the form data. Not only does the author have a video walkthrough of how to do it, he also provides detailed explanations of each code section.

The section that you might want to take note of in that link is where the author pulls the form data and directly assigns them to the cells.

$pdf->SetX(140); 
$pdf->SetFont('Arial', 'I'); 
$pdf->Cell(200, 15, $_POST['address'], 0, 2); 
$pdf->Cell(200, 15, $_POST['city'] . ', ' . $_POST['province'], 0, 2); 
$pdf->Cell(200, 15, $_POST['postal_code'] . ' ' . $_POST['country']); 
$pdf->Ln(100);

I'm not quite sure why you would want to check if your ajax_add_pdf_file doesn't exist. It seems unnecessary to me.

Fpdf in function - Stack Overflow

fpdf
Rectangle 27 1

I wrote a simple module that automatizes the job of importing/including module scripts in JavaScript. Give it a try and please spare some feedback! :) For detailed explanation of the code refer to this blog post: http://stamat.wordpress.com/2013/04/12/javascript-require-import-include-modules/

var _rmod = _rmod || {}; //require module namespace
_rmod.on_ready_fn_stack = [];
_rmod.libpath = '';
_rmod.imported = {};
_rmod.loading = {
    scripts: {},
    length: 0
};

_rmod.findScriptPath = function(script_name) {
    var script_elems = document.getElementsByTagName('script');
    for (var i = 0; i < script_elems.length; i++) {
        if (script_elems[i].src.endsWith(script_name)) {
            var href = window.location.href;
            href = href.substring(0, href.lastIndexOf('/'));
            var url = script_elems[i].src.substring(0, script_elems[i].length - script_name.length);
            return url.substring(href.length+1, url.length);
        }
    }
    return '';
};

_rmod.libpath = _rmod.findScriptPath('script.js'); //Path of your main script used to mark the root directory of your library, any library


_rmod.injectScript = function(script_name, uri, callback, prepare) {

    if(!prepare)
        prepare(script_name, uri);

    var script_elem = document.createElement('script');
    script_elem.type = 'text/javascript';
    script_elem.title = script_name;
    script_elem.src = uri;
    script_elem.async = true;
    script_elem.defer = false;

    if(!callback)
        script_elem.onload = function() {
            callback(script_name, uri);
        };

    document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild(script_elem);
};

_rmod.requirePrepare = function(script_name, uri) {
    _rmod.loading.scripts[script_name] = uri;
    _rmod.loading.length++;
};

_rmod.requireCallback = function(script_name, uri) {
    _rmod.loading.length--;
    delete _rmod.loading.scripts[script_name];
    _rmod.imported[script_name] = uri;

    if(_rmod.loading.length == 0)
        _rmod.onReady();
};

_rmod.onReady = function() {
    if (!_rmod.LOADED) {
        for (var i = 0; i < _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack.length; i++){
            _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack[i]();
        });
        _rmod.LOADED = true;
    }
};

//you can rename based on your liking. I chose require, but it can be called include or anything else that is easy for you to remember or write, except import because it is reserved for future use.
var require = function(script_name) {
    var np = script_name.split('.');
    if (np[np.length-1] === '*') {
        np.pop();
        np.push('_all');
    }

    script_name = np.join('.');
    var uri = _rmod.libpath + np.join('/')+'.js';
    if (!_rmod.loading.scripts.hasOwnProperty(script_name) 
     && !_rmod.imported.hasOwnProperty(script_name)) {
        _rmod.injectScript(script_name, uri, 
            _rmod.requireCallback, 
                _rmod.requirePrepare);
    }
};

var ready = function(fn) {
    _rmod.on_ready_fn_stack.push(fn);
};

// ----- USAGE -----

require('ivar.util.array');
require('ivar.util.string');
require('ivar.net.*');

ready(function(){
    //do something when required scripts are loaded
});

Dynamically load a JavaScript file - Stack Overflow

javascript file import include
Rectangle 27 3

Notwithstanding the really weird behavior, :+ cannot possibly be the operator you want. Since you did not annotate the return type of unitList, I don't know what you expected. I assume you wanted to return either Iterable[Square] or Iterable[Iterable[Square]]. So let's see how you can get them, and why :+ is incorrect.

First of all, u1, u2 and u3 are all Iterable[Iterable[Square]], though the exact subtype varies. This should be easy to understand: cross returns Iterable[Square], so yielding cross in a for-comprehension results in an Iterable[Iterable[Square]].

:+
u1
Iterable(a, b, c)
u1 :+ u2
Iterable(a, b, c, u2)
Iterable[X]
Iterable[Square]
Iterable[Iterable[Square]]
u2
Iterable[Iterable[AnyRef]]

Since the type of u1, u2 and u3 are essentially the same, the correct operation in all likelyhood is this:

u1 ++ u2 ++ u3

Which will return Iterable[Iterable[Square]]. Now, if you want to remove the nesting and return Iterable[Square], you can flatten this:

(u1 ++ u2 ++ u3).flatten

One of these two things is probably what you want.

Now, as for the "random" switching, there's nothing random about it. In each case, there are two for-comprehensions, and the actual implementation of the resulting collection depends on the implementation of the original collection. So, let's consider it:

  • u1: outer type derives from Range, inner type from String (first parameter to cross)
  • u2: outer type derives from String, inner type from List (first parameter to cross)
  • u3: outer type derives from List, inner type derives from String (first parameter to cross)

So it can be easily deduced that for-comprehensions over String (WrappedString, actually) and Range result in Vector, while for-comprehensions over List result in List.

Thanks for the detailed explanation. I stared at the code more yesterday and it all began to make sense.

Scala collection: totally unpredictable behaviours - Stack Overflow

scala scala-2.8 yield scala-collections
Rectangle 27 78

Explanation of the code

DocumentFragment doesn't implement DOM methods. Using document.createElement in conjunction with innerHTML removes the <head> and <body> tags (even when the created element is a root element, <html>). Therefore, the solution should be sought elsewhere. I have created a cross-browser string-to-DOM function, which makes use of an invisible inline-frame.

/*
 @param String html    The string with HTML which has be converted to a DOM object
 @param func callback  (optional) Callback(HTMLDocument doc, function destroy)
 @returns              undefined if callback exists, else: Object
                        HTMLDocument doc  DOM fetched from Parameter:html
                        function destroy  Removes HTMLDocument doc.         */
function string2dom(html, callback){
    /* Sanitise the string */
    html = sanitiseHTML(html); /*Defined at the bottom of the answer*/

    /* Create an IFrame */
    var iframe = document.createElement("iframe");
    iframe.style.display = "none";
    document.body.appendChild(iframe);

    var doc = iframe.contentDocument || iframe.contentWindow.document;
    doc.open();
    doc.write(html);
    doc.close();

    function destroy(){
        iframe.parentNode.removeChild(iframe);
    }
    if(callback) callback(doc, destroy);
    else return {"doc": doc, "destroy": destroy};
}

/* @name sanitiseHTML
   @param String html  A string representing HTML code
   @return String      A new string, fully stripped of external resources.
                       All "external" attributes (href, src) are prefixed by data- */

function sanitiseHTML(html){
    /* Adds a <!-\"'--> before every matched tag, so that unterminated quotes
        aren't preventing the browser from splitting a tag. Test case:
       '<input style="foo;b:url(0);><input onclick="<input type=button onclick="too() href=;>">' */
    var prefix = "<!--\"'-->";
    /*Attributes should not be prefixed by these characters. This list is not
     complete, but will be sufficient for this function.
      (see http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-xml/#NT-NameChar) */
    var att = "[^-a-z0-9:._]";
    var tag = "<[a-z]";
    var any = "(?:[^<>\"']*(?:\"[^\"]*\"|'[^']*'))*?[^<>]*";
    var etag = "(?:>|(?=<))";

    /*
      @name ae
      @description          Converts a given string in a sequence of the
                             original input and the HTML entity
      @param String string  String to convert
      */
    var entityEnd = "(?:;|(?!\\d))";
    var ents = {" ":"(?:\\s|&nbsp;?|&#0*32"+entityEnd+"|&#x0*20"+entityEnd+")",
                "(":"(?:\\(|&#0*40"+entityEnd+"|&#x0*28"+entityEnd+")",
                ")":"(?:\\)|&#0*41"+entityEnd+"|&#x0*29"+entityEnd+")",
                ".":"(?:\\.|&#0*46"+entityEnd+"|&#x0*2e"+entityEnd+")"};
                /*Placeholder to avoid tricky filter-circumventing methods*/
    var charMap = {};
    var s = ents[" "]+"*"; /* Short-hand space */
    /* Important: Must be pre- and postfixed by < and >. RE matches a whole tag! */
    function ae(string){
        var all_chars_lowercase = string.toLowerCase();
        if(ents[string]) return ents[string];
        var all_chars_uppercase = string.toUpperCase();
        var RE_res = "";
        for(var i=0; i<string.length; i++){
            var char_lowercase = all_chars_lowercase.charAt(i);
            if(charMap[char_lowercase]){
                RE_res += charMap[char_lowercase];
                continue;
            }
            var char_uppercase = all_chars_uppercase.charAt(i);
            var RE_sub = [char_lowercase];
            RE_sub.push("&#0*" + char_lowercase.charCodeAt(0) + entityEnd);
            RE_sub.push("&#x0*" + char_lowercase.charCodeAt(0).toString(16) + entityEnd);
            if(char_lowercase != char_uppercase){
                RE_sub.push("&#0*" + char_uppercase.charCodeAt(0) + entityEnd);   
                RE_sub.push("&#x0*" + char_uppercase.charCodeAt(0).toString(16) + entityEnd);
            }
            RE_sub = "(?:" + RE_sub.join("|") + ")";
            RE_res += (charMap[char_lowercase] = RE_sub);
        }
        return(ents[string] = RE_res);
    }
    /*
      @name by
      @description  second argument for the replace function.
      */
    function by(match, group1, group2){
        /* Adds a data-prefix before every external pointer */
        return group1 + "data-" + group2 
    }
    /*
      @name cr
      @description            Selects a HTML element and performs a
                                  search-and-replace on attributes
      @param String selector  HTML substring to match
      @param String attribute RegExp-escaped; HTML element attribute to match
      @param String marker    Optional RegExp-escaped; marks the prefix
      @param String delimiter Optional RegExp escaped; non-quote delimiters
      @param String end       Optional RegExp-escaped; forces the match to
                                  end before an occurence of <end> when 
                                  quotes are missing
     */
    function cr(selector, attribute, marker, delimiter, end){
        if(typeof selector == "string") selector = new RegExp(selector, "gi");
        marker = typeof marker == "string" ? marker : "\\s*=";
        delimiter = typeof delimiter == "string" ? delimiter : "";
        end = typeof end == "string" ? end : "";
        var is_end = end && "?";
        var re1 = new RegExp("("+att+")("+attribute+marker+"(?:\\s*\"[^\""+delimiter+"]*\"|\\s*'[^'"+delimiter+"]*'|[^\\s"+delimiter+"]+"+is_end+")"+end+")", "gi");
        html = html.replace(selector, function(match){
            return prefix + match.replace(re1, by);
        });
    }
    /* 
      @name cri
      @description            Selects an attribute of a HTML element, and
                               performs a search-and-replace on certain values
      @param String selector  HTML element to match
      @param String attribute RegExp-escaped; HTML element attribute to match
      @param String front     RegExp-escaped; attribute value, prefix to match
      @param String flags     Optional RegExp flags, default "gi"
      @param String delimiter Optional RegExp-escaped; non-quote delimiters
      @param String end       Optional RegExp-escaped; forces the match to
                                  end before an occurence of <end> when 
                                  quotes are missing
     */
    function cri(selector, attribute, front, flags, delimiter, end){
        if(typeof selector == "string") selector = new RegExp(selector, "gi");
        flags = typeof flags == "string" ? flags : "gi";
         var re1 = new RegExp("("+att+attribute+"\\s*=)((?:\\s*\"[^\"]*\"|\\s*'[^']*'|[^\\s>]+))", "gi");

        end = typeof end == "string" ? end + ")" : ")";
        var at1 = new RegExp('(")('+front+'[^"]+")', flags);
        var at2 = new RegExp("(')("+front+"[^']+')", flags);
        var at3 = new RegExp("()("+front+'(?:"[^"]+"|\'[^\']+\'|(?:(?!'+delimiter+').)+)'+end, flags);

        var handleAttr = function(match, g1, g2){
            if(g2.charAt(0) == '"') return g1+g2.replace(at1, by);
            if(g2.charAt(0) == "'") return g1+g2.replace(at2, by);
            return g1+g2.replace(at3, by);
        };
        html = html.replace(selector, function(match){
             return prefix + match.replace(re1, handleAttr);
        });
    }

    /* <meta http-equiv=refresh content="  ; url= " > */
    html = html.replace(new RegExp("<meta"+any+att+"http-equiv\\s*=\\s*(?:\""+ae("refresh")+"\""+any+etag+"|'"+ae("refresh")+"'"+any+etag+"|"+ae("refresh")+"(?:"+ae(" ")+any+etag+"|"+etag+"))", "gi"), "<!-- meta http-equiv=refresh stripped-->");

    /* Stripping all scripts */
    html = html.replace(new RegExp("<script"+any+">\\s*//\\s*<\\[CDATA\\[[\\S\\s]*?]]>\\s*</script[^>]*>", "gi"), "<!--CDATA script-->");
    html = html.replace(/<script[\S\s]+?<\/script\s*>/gi, "<!--Non-CDATA script-->");
    cr(tag+any+att+"on[-a-z0-9:_.]+="+any+etag, "on[-a-z0-9:_.]+"); /* Event listeners */

    cr(tag+any+att+"href\\s*="+any+etag, "href"); /* Linked elements */
    cr(tag+any+att+"src\\s*="+any+etag, "src"); /* Embedded elements */

    cr("<object"+any+att+"data\\s*="+any+etag, "data"); /* <object data= > */
    cr("<applet"+any+att+"codebase\\s*="+any+etag, "codebase"); /* <applet codebase= > */

    /* <param name=movie value= >*/
    cr("<param"+any+att+"name\\s*=\\s*(?:\""+ae("movie")+"\""+any+etag+"|'"+ae("movie")+"'"+any+etag+"|"+ae("movie")+"(?:"+ae(" ")+any+etag+"|"+etag+"))", "value");

    /* <style> and < style=  > url()*/
    cr(/<style[^>]*>(?:[^"']*(?:"[^"]*"|'[^']*'))*?[^'"]*(?:<\/style|$)/gi, "url", "\\s*\\(\\s*", "", "\\s*\\)");
    cri(tag+any+att+"style\\s*="+any+etag, "style", ae("url")+s+ae("(")+s, 0, s+ae(")"), ae(")"));

    /* IE7- CSS expression() */
    cr(/<style[^>]*>(?:[^"']*(?:"[^"]*"|'[^']*'))*?[^'"]*(?:<\/style|$)/gi, "expression", "\\s*\\(\\s*", "", "\\s*\\)");
    cri(tag+any+att+"style\\s*="+any+etag, "style", ae("expression")+s+ae("(")+s, 0, s+ae(")"), ae(")"));
    return html.replace(new RegExp("(?:"+prefix+")+", "g"), prefix);
}

The sanitiseHTML function is based on my replace_all_rel_by_abs function (see this answer). The sanitiseHTML function is completely rewritten though, in order to achieve maximum efficiency and reliability.

Additionally, a new set of RegExps are added to remove all scripts and event handlers (including CSS expression(), IE7-). To make sure that all tags are parsed as expected, the adjusted tags are prefixed by <!--'"-->. This prefix is necessary to correctly parse nested "event handlers" in conjunction with unterminated quotes: <a id="><input onclick="<div onmousemove=evil()>">.

These RegExps are dynamically created using an internal function cr/cri (Create Replace [Inline]). These functions accept a list of arguments, and create and execute an advanced RE replacement. To make sure that HTML entities aren't breaking a RegExp (refresh in <meta http-equiv=refresh> could be written in various ways), the dynamically created RegExps are partially constructed by function ae (Any Entity). The actual replacements are done by function by (replace by). In this implementation, by adds data- before all matched attributes.

  • All <script>//<[CDATA[ .. //]]></script> occurrences are striped. This step is necessary, because CDATA sections allow </script> strings inside the code. After this replacement has been executed, it's safe to go to the next replacement:
<script>...</script>
<meta http-equiv=refresh .. >

All event listeners and external pointers/attributes (href, src, url()) are prefixed by data-, as described previously.

An IFrame object is created. IFrames are less likely to leak memory (contrary to the htmlfile ActiveXObject). The IFrame becomes invisible, and is appended to the document, so that the DOM can be accessed. document.write() are used to write HTML to the IFrame. document.open() and document.close() are used to empty the previous contents of the document, so that the generated document is an exact copy of the given html string.

  • If a callback function has been specified, the function will be called with two arguments. The first argument is a reference to the generated document object. The second argument is a function, which destroys the generated DOM tree when called. This function should be called when you don't need the tree any more.If the callback function isn't specified, the function returns an object consisting of two properties (doc and destroy), which behave the same as the previously mentioned arguments.
  • Setting the designMode property to "On" will stop a frame from executing scripts (not supported in Chrome). If you have to preserve the <script> tags for a specific reason, you can use iframe.designMode = "On" instead of the script stripping feature.
htmlfile activeXObject
htmlfile
href
src
data-
data-href
elem.getAttribute("data-href")
elem.setAttribute("data-href", "...")
elem.dataset.href
elem.dataset.href = "..."
<link rel="stylesheet" href="main.css" />
<script>document.body.bgColor="red";</script>
<img src="128x128.png" />

sanitiseHTML(html) Paste this bookmarklet in the location's bar. It will offer an option to inject a textarea, showing the sanitised HTML string.

javascript:void(function(){var s=document.createElement("script");s.src="http://rob.lekensteyn.nl/html-sanitizer.js";document.body.appendChild(s)})();
string2dom(html)
string2dom("<html><head><title>Test</title></head></html>", function(doc, destroy){
    alert(doc.title); /* Alert: "Test" */
    destroy();
});

var test = string2dom("<div id='secret'></div>");
alert(test.doc.getElementById("secret").tagName); /* Alert: "DIV" */
test.destroy();
sanitiseHTML(html)
replace_all_rel_by_abs(html)
<applet>

+1 from me, too. I had already come to the same conclusions regarding fragments (after extensive researching and testing). The interesting part is setting designMode to on to prevent script execution. Anyway, thanks a lot... this is more the kind of answer I was after. The only real shame is the many potential holes so I need to give this a bit more thought.

See point 3 (+ the corresponding replace function) and the first two references at the end. If you're absolutely certain that a certain tag (<applet>?) won't appear, there's not need to implement it. If you don't have to keep the embedded elements for a specific goal, removing them through a RE is easy. Eg.: .replace(/<object[\S\s]+?<\/object\s*>/gi, ""). Some embedded objects may have an omitted close tag. In that case, use: .replace(/<embed[^>]+>[\S\s]*?<\/embed\s*>/gi, "").replace(/<embed[^>]*>/gi, "").

<stylesheet>
<style>
expressions
-moz-behaviors

@Rob - jsfiddle.net/JFSKe/2 is a trivial attack on your sanitizer. I know of at least one other trivial way to defeat it and I'm not even vaguely an XSS expert.

@Rob - Your code doesn't seem to be sanitizing on* attributes correctly at all now. This input "<html><head><title>Test</title></head><body onload='alert(\"XSS\")'></html>" displays an "XSS" alert. I strongly recommend that you build yourself a very thorough test suite.

javascript - Can I load an entire HTML document into a document fragme...

javascript html internet-explorer dom
Rectangle 27 62

Explanation of the getter/setter concept

attr_accessor is a built-in Ruby method and has no special meaning in the context ActiveRecord. attr_accessor :tag_list is basically equivalent to this code:

# getter
def tag_list
  @tag_list
end

# setter
def tag_list=(val)
  @tag_list = val
end

In ActiveRecord models, however, it could be that you want something like this:

def tag_list
  self[:tag_list]
end

def tag_list=(val)
  self[:tag_list] = val
end

There is a slight difference: With the first method, obj[:tag_list] doesn't use the same storage as your getter and setter. With the latter, it does.

In Ruby, the following two lines of code are equivalent

thing.blabla
thing.blabla()

Both call the method blabla of the object thing and evaluate to the last expression evaluated within that method. This means, you also don't need a return statement in the case of the above getter method, because the method simply returns the last expression in the method (@tag_list, the value of the instance variable).

Also, those two lines of code are equivalent:

thing.blabla=("abc")
thing.blabla = "abc"

Both call the method blabla= of the object thing. The special name with the = character can be used like any other method name.

The fact that attributes, as they are sometimes called, are in fact plain methods, you can also use some special logic transformed on the values before returning or accepting them. Example:

def price_in_dollar
  @price_in_euro * 0.78597815
end

def price_in_dollar=(val)
  @price_in_euro = val / 0.78597815
end

does it matter what I write for the argument in the setter? or is it just def tag_list=(whatever); @tag_list = whatever; end ?

@jay: No, it does not matter. Also, this is not Rails-specific, it's a Ruby thing. I edited your question to reflect this.

niklas, sorry if i wasn't clear - i really need to make this work in a rails context. it's an html form that is submitting, and I can't retrieve the values from the attribute tag_list. This answer doesn't work.. I really would like to have tag_list accept from params[:object][:tag_list]

ruby - What would a default getter and setter look like in rails? - St...

ruby-on-rails ruby ruby-on-rails-3 virtual-attribute attr-accessor
Rectangle 27 1473

The Long Answer: there are 3 different branches to delete!

If you want more detailed explanations of the following commands, then see the long answers in the next section.

Deleting a remote branch:

git push origin --delete <branch>  # Git version 1.7.0 or newer
git push origin :<branch>          # Git versions older than 1.7.0

Deleting a local branch:

git branch --delete <branch>
git branch -d <branch> # Shorter version
git branch -D <branch> # Force delete un-merged branches

Deleting a local remote-tracking branch:

When you're dealing with deleting branches both locally and remotely, keep in mind that there are 3 different branches involved:

  • The local remote-tracking branch origin/X that tracks the remote branch X.
git branch -rd origin/bugfix
origin/bugfix
bugfix
origin

To delete that actual remote branch

git push origin --delete bugfix

The following sections describe additional details to consider when deleting your remote and remote-tracking branches.

Note that deleting the remote branch X from the command line using a git push will also delete the local remote-tracking branch origin/X, so it is not necessary to prune the obsolete remote-tracking branch with git fetch --prune or git fetch -p, though it wouldn't hurt if you did it anyway.

You can verify that the remote-tracking branch origin/X was also deleted by running the following:

# View just remote-tracking branches
git branch --remotes
git branch -r

# View both strictly local as well as remote-tracking branches
git branch --all
git branch -a

If you didn't delete your remote branch X from the command line (like above), then your local repo will still contain (a now obsolete) remote-tracking branch origin/X. This can happen if you deleted a remote branch directly through GitHub's web interface, for example.

git fetch
--prune
-p

Note that this removes all obsolete local remote-tracking branches for any remote branches that no longer exist on the remote

git fetch origin --prune
git fetch origin -p # Shorter

Here is the relevant quote from the 1.6.6 release notes (emphasis mine):

"git fetch" learned --all and --multipleoptions, to run fetch from many repositories, and --prune option to remove remote tracking branches that went stale. These make "git remote update" and "git remote prune" less necessary (there is no plan to remove "remote update" nor "remote prune", though).

Alternatively, instead of pruning your obsolete local remote-tracking branches through git fetch -p, you can avoid making the extra network operation by just manually removing the branch(es) with the --remote or -r flags:

git branch --delete --remotes origin/X
git branch -dr origin/X # Shorter

From your illustration, I can see there are local clone repo and remote origin repo. So there are at least two physical branches. Where is the third branch to delete? Is the third branch only a pointer pointing to a commit in the local clone repo?

@huggie that's pretty much correct. Branches in Git are just bookmarks attached to commits. So in my graphs above, there are X and origin/X bookmarks in the local clone (2 branches), and then there is X on the remote (making 3 branches).

+1 for the remote tracking branch. This branch is what causes issues when you clone someone else's branch. It keeps on tracking your commits and asking you if you want to push to that person's branch.

How do I delete a Git branch both locally and remotely? - Stack Overfl...

git git-branch git-remote
Rectangle 27 1473

The Long Answer: there are 3 different branches to delete!

If you want more detailed explanations of the following commands, then see the long answers in the next section.

Deleting a remote branch:

git push origin --delete <branch>  # Git version 1.7.0 or newer
git push origin :<branch>          # Git versions older than 1.7.0

Deleting a local branch:

git branch --delete <branch>
git branch -d <branch> # Shorter version
git branch -D <branch> # Force delete un-merged branches

Deleting a local remote-tracking branch:

When you're dealing with deleting branches both locally and remotely, keep in mind that there are 3 different branches involved:

  • The local remote-tracking branch origin/X that tracks the remote branch X.
git branch -rd origin/bugfix
origin/bugfix
bugfix
origin

To delete that actual remote branch

git push origin --delete bugfix

The following sections describe additional details to consider when deleting your remote and remote-tracking branches.

Note that deleting the remote branch X from the command line using a git push will also delete the local remote-tracking branch origin/X, so it is not necessary to prune the obsolete remote-tracking branch with git fetch --prune or git fetch -p, though it wouldn't hurt if you did it anyway.

You can verify that the remote-tracking branch origin/X was also deleted by running the following:

# View just remote-tracking branches
git branch --remotes
git branch -r

# View both strictly local as well as remote-tracking branches
git branch --all
git branch -a

If you didn't delete your remote branch X from the command line (like above), then your local repo will still contain (a now obsolete) remote-tracking branch origin/X. This can happen if you deleted a remote branch directly through GitHub's web interface, for example.

git fetch
--prune
-p

Note that this removes all obsolete local remote-tracking branches for any remote branches that no longer exist on the remote

git fetch origin --prune
git fetch origin -p # Shorter

Here is the relevant quote from the 1.6.6 release notes (emphasis mine):

"git fetch" learned --all and --multipleoptions, to run fetch from many repositories, and --prune option to remove remote tracking branches that went stale. These make "git remote update" and "git remote prune" less necessary (there is no plan to remove "remote update" nor "remote prune", though).

Alternatively, instead of pruning your obsolete local remote-tracking branches through git fetch -p, you can avoid making the extra network operation by just manually removing the branch(es) with the --remote or -r flags:

git branch --delete --remotes origin/X
git branch -dr origin/X # Shorter

From your illustration, I can see there are local clone repo and remote origin repo. So there are at least two physical branches. Where is the third branch to delete? Is the third branch only a pointer pointing to a commit in the local clone repo?

@huggie that's pretty much correct. Branches in Git are just bookmarks attached to commits. So in my graphs above, there are X and origin/X bookmarks in the local clone (2 branches), and then there is X on the remote (making 3 branches).

+1 for the remote tracking branch. This branch is what causes issues when you clone someone else's branch. It keeps on tracking your commits and asking you if you want to push to that person's branch.

How do I delete a Git branch both locally and remotely? - Stack Overfl...

git git-branch git-remote
Rectangle 27 1420

The Long Answer: there are 3 different branches to delete!

If you want more detailed explanations of the following commands, then see the long answers in the next section.

Deleting a remote branch:

git push origin --delete <branch>  # Git version 1.7.0 or newer
git push origin :<branch>          # Git versions older than 1.7.0

Deleting a local branch:

git branch --delete <branch>
git branch -d <branch> # Shorter version
git branch -D <branch> # Force delete un-merged branches

Deleting a local remote-tracking branch:

When you're dealing with deleting branches both locally and remotely, keep in mind that there are 3 different branches involved:

  • The local remote-tracking branch origin/X that tracks the remote branch X.
git branch -rd origin/bugfix
origin/bugfix
bugfix
origin

To delete that actual remote branch

git push origin --delete bugfix

The following sections describe additional details to consider when deleting your remote and remote-tracking branches.

Note that deleting the remote branch X from the command line using a git push will also delete the local remote-tracking branch origin/X, so it is not necessary to prune the obsolete remote-tracking branch with git fetch --prune or git fetch -p, though it wouldn't hurt if you did it anyway.

You can verify that the remote-tracking branch origin/X was also deleted by running the following:

# View just remote-tracking branches
git branch --remotes
git branch -r

# View both strictly local as well as remote-tracking branches
git branch --all
git branch -a

If you didn't delete your remote branch X from the command line (like above), then your local repo will still contain (a now obsolete) remote-tracking branch origin/X. This can happen if you deleted a remote branch directly through GitHub's web interface, for example.

git fetch
--prune
-p

Note that this removes all obsolete local remote-tracking branches for any remote branches that no longer exist on the remote

git fetch origin --prune
git fetch origin -p # Shorter

Here is the relevant quote from the 1.6.6 release notes (emphasis mine):

"git fetch" learned --all and --multipleoptions, to run fetch from many repositories, and --prune option to remove remote tracking branches that went stale. These make "git remote update" and "git remote prune" less necessary (there is no plan to remove "remote update" nor "remote prune", though).

Alternatively, instead of pruning your obsolete local remote-tracking branches through git fetch -p, you can avoid making the extra network operation by just manually removing the branch(es) with the --remote or -r flags:

git branch --delete --remotes origin/X
git branch -dr origin/X # Shorter

From your illustration, I can see there are local clone repo and remote origin repo. So there are at least two physical branches. Where is the third branch to delete? Is the third branch only a pointer pointing to a commit in the local clone repo?

@huggie that's pretty much correct. Branches in Git are just bookmarks attached to commits. So in my graphs above, there are X and origin/X bookmarks in the local clone (2 branches), and then there is X on the remote (making 3 branches).

+1 for the remote tracking branch. This branch is what causes issues when you clone someone else's branch. It keeps on tracking your commits and asking you if you want to push to that person's branch.

How do I delete a Git branch both locally and remotely? - Stack Overfl...

git git-branch git-remote
Rectangle 27 1418

The Long Answer: there are 3 different branches to delete!

If you want more detailed explanations of the following commands, then see the long answers in the next section.

Deleting a remote branch:

git push origin --delete <branch>  # Git version 1.7.0 or newer
git push origin :<branch>          # Git versions older than 1.7.0

Deleting a local branch:

git branch --delete <branch>
git branch -d <branch> # Shorter version
git branch -D <branch> # Force delete un-merged branches

Deleting a local remote-tracking branch:

When you're dealing with deleting branches both locally and remotely, keep in mind that there are 3 different branches involved:

  • The local remote-tracking branch origin/X that tracks the remote branch X.
git branch -rd origin/bugfix
origin/bugfix
bugfix
origin

To delete that actual remote branch

git push origin --delete bugfix

The following sections describe additional details to consider when deleting your remote and remote-tracking branches.

Note that deleting the remote branch X from the command line using a git push will also delete the local remote-tracking branch origin/X, so it is not necessary to prune the obsolete remote-tracking branch with git fetch --prune or git fetch -p, though it wouldn't hurt if you did it anyway.

You can verify that the remote-tracking branch origin/X was also deleted by running the following:

# View just remote-tracking branches
git branch --remotes
git branch -r

# View both strictly local as well as remote-tracking branches
git branch --all
git branch -a

If you didn't delete your remote branch X from the command line (like above), then your local repo will still contain (a now obsolete) remote-tracking branch origin/X. This can happen if you deleted a remote branch directly through GitHub's web interface, for example.

git fetch
--prune
-p

Note that this removes all obsolete local remote-tracking branches for any remote branches that no longer exist on the remote

git fetch origin --prune
git fetch origin -p # Shorter

Here is the relevant quote from the 1.6.6 release notes (emphasis mine):

"git fetch" learned --all and --multipleoptions, to run fetch from many repositories, and --prune option to remove remote tracking branches that went stale. These make "git remote update" and "git remote prune" less necessary (there is no plan to remove "remote update" nor "remote prune", though).

Alternatively, instead of pruning your obsolete local remote-tracking branches through git fetch -p, you can avoid making the extra network operation by just manually removing the branch(es) with the --remote or -r flags:

git branch --delete --remotes origin/X
git branch -dr origin/X # Shorter

From your illustration, I can see there are local clone repo and remote origin repo. So there are at least two physical branches. Where is the third branch to delete? Is the third branch only a pointer pointing to a commit in the local clone repo?

@huggie that's pretty much correct. Branches in Git are just bookmarks attached to commits. So in my graphs above, there are X and origin/X bookmarks in the local clone (2 branches), and then there is X on the remote (making 3 branches).

+1 for the remote tracking branch. This branch is what causes issues when you clone someone else's branch. It keeps on tracking your commits and asking you if you want to push to that person's branch.

How do I delete a Git branch both locally and remotely? - Stack Overfl...

git git-branch git-remote
Rectangle 27 1418

The Long Answer: there are 3 different branches to delete!

If you want more detailed explanations of the following commands, then see the long answers in the next section.

Deleting a remote branch:

git push origin --delete <branch>  # Git version 1.7.0 or newer
git push origin :<branch>          # Git versions older than 1.7.0

Deleting a local branch:

git branch --delete <branch>
git branch -d <branch> # Shorter version
git branch -D <branch> # Force delete un-merged branches

Deleting a local remote-tracking branch:

When you're dealing with deleting branches both locally and remotely, keep in mind that there are 3 different branches involved:

  • The local remote-tracking branch origin/X that tracks the remote branch X.
git branch -rd origin/bugfix
origin/bugfix
bugfix
origin

To delete that actual remote branch

git push origin --delete bugfix

The following sections describe additional details to consider when deleting your remote and remote-tracking branches.

Note that deleting the remote branch X from the command line using a git push will also delete the local remote-tracking branch origin/X, so it is not necessary to prune the obsolete remote-tracking branch with git fetch --prune or git fetch -p, though it wouldn't hurt if you did it anyway.

You can verify that the remote-tracking branch origin/X was also deleted by running the following:

# View just remote-tracking branches
git branch --remotes
git branch -r

# View both strictly local as well as remote-tracking branches
git branch --all
git branch -a

If you didn't delete your remote branch X from the command line (like above), then your local repo will still contain (a now obsolete) remote-tracking branch origin/X. This can happen if you deleted a remote branch directly through GitHub's web interface, for example.

git fetch
--prune
-p

Note that this removes all obsolete local remote-tracking branches for any remote branches that no longer exist on the remote

git fetch origin --prune
git fetch origin -p # Shorter

Here is the relevant quote from the 1.6.6 release notes (emphasis mine):

"git fetch" learned --all and --multipleoptions, to run fetch from many repositories, and --prune option to remove remote tracking branches that went stale. These make "git remote update" and "git remote prune" less necessary (there is no plan to remove "remote update" nor "remote prune", though).

Alternatively, instead of pruning your obsolete local remote-tracking branches through git fetch -p, you can avoid making the extra network operation by just manually removing the branch(es) with the --remote or -r flags:

git branch --delete --remotes origin/X
git branch -dr origin/X # Shorter

From your illustration, I can see there are local clone repo and remote origin repo. So there are at least two physical branches. Where is the third branch to delete? Is the third branch only a pointer pointing to a commit in the local clone repo?

@huggie that's pretty much correct. Branches in Git are just bookmarks attached to commits. So in my graphs above, there are X and origin/X bookmarks in the local clone (2 branches), and then there is X on the remote (making 3 branches).

+1 for the remote tracking branch. This branch is what causes issues when you clone someone else's branch. It keeps on tracking your commits and asking you if you want to push to that person's branch.

How do I delete a Git branch both locally and remotely? - Stack Overfl...

git git-branch git-remote
Rectangle 27 1416

The Long Answer: there are 3 different branches to delete!

If you want more detailed explanations of the following commands, then see the long answers in the next section.

Deleting a remote branch:

git push origin --delete <branch>  # Git version 1.7.0 or newer
git push origin :<branch>          # Git versions older than 1.7.0

Deleting a local branch:

git branch --delete <branch>
git branch -d <branch> # Shorter version
git branch -D <branch> # Force delete un-merged branches

Deleting a local remote-tracking branch:

When you're dealing with deleting branches both locally and remotely, keep in mind that there are 3 different branches involved:

  • The local remote-tracking branch origin/X that tracks the remote branch X.
git branch -rd origin/bugfix
origin/bugfix
bugfix
origin

To delete that actual remote branch

git push origin --delete bugfix

The following sections describe additional details to consider when deleting your remote and remote-tracking branches.

Note that deleting the remote branch X from the command line using a git push will also delete the local remote-tracking branch origin/X, so it is not necessary to prune the obsolete remote-tracking branch with git fetch --prune or git fetch -p, though it wouldn't hurt if you did it anyway.

You can verify that the remote-tracking branch origin/X was also deleted by running the following:

# View just remote-tracking branches
git branch --remotes
git branch -r

# View both strictly local as well as remote-tracking branches
git branch --all
git branch -a

If you didn't delete your remote branch X from the command line (like above), then your local repo will still contain (a now obsolete) remote-tracking branch origin/X. This can happen if you deleted a remote branch directly through GitHub's web interface, for example.

git fetch
--prune
-p

Note that this removes all obsolete local remote-tracking branches for any remote branches that no longer exist on the remote

git fetch origin --prune
git fetch origin -p # Shorter

Here is the relevant quote from the 1.6.6 release notes (emphasis mine):

"git fetch" learned --all and --multipleoptions, to run fetch from many repositories, and --prune option to remove remote tracking branches that went stale. These make "git remote update" and "git remote prune" less necessary (there is no plan to remove "remote update" nor "remote prune", though).

Alternatively, instead of pruning your obsolete local remote-tracking branches through git fetch -p, you can avoid making the extra network operation by just manually removing the branch(es) with the --remote or -r flags:

git branch --delete --remotes origin/X
git branch -dr origin/X # Shorter

From your illustration, I can see there are local clone repo and remote origin repo. So there are at least two physical branches. Where is the third branch to delete? Is the third branch only a pointer pointing to a commit in the local clone repo?

@huggie that's pretty much correct. Branches in Git are just bookmarks attached to commits. So in my graphs above, there are X and origin/X bookmarks in the local clone (2 branches), and then there is X on the remote (making 3 branches).

+1 for the remote tracking branch. This branch is what causes issues when you clone someone else's branch. It keeps on tracking your commits and asking you if you want to push to that person's branch.

How do I delete a Git branch both locally and remotely? - Stack Overfl...

git git-branch git-remote
Rectangle 27 1416

The Long Answer: there are 3 different branches to delete!

If you want more detailed explanations of the following commands, then see the long answers in the next section.

Deleting a remote branch:

git push origin --delete <branch>  # Git version 1.7.0 or newer
git push origin :<branch>          # Git versions older than 1.7.0

Deleting a local branch:

git branch --delete <branch>
git branch -d <branch> # Shorter version
git branch -D <branch> # Force delete un-merged branches

Deleting a local remote-tracking branch:

When you're dealing with deleting branches both locally and remotely, keep in mind that there are 3 different branches involved:

  • The local remote-tracking branch origin/X that tracks the remote branch X.
git branch -rd origin/bugfix
origin/bugfix
bugfix
origin

To delete that actual remote branch

git push origin --delete bugfix

The following sections describe additional details to consider when deleting your remote and remote-tracking branches.

Note that deleting the remote branch X from the command line using a git push will also delete the local remote-tracking branch origin/X, so it is not necessary to prune the obsolete remote-tracking branch with git fetch --prune or git fetch -p, though it wouldn't hurt if you did it anyway.

You can verify that the remote-tracking branch origin/X was also deleted by running the following:

# View just remote-tracking branches
git branch --remotes
git branch -r

# View both strictly local as well as remote-tracking branches
git branch --all
git branch -a

If you didn't delete your remote branch X from the command line (like above), then your local repo will still contain (a now obsolete) remote-tracking branch origin/X. This can happen if you deleted a remote branch directly through GitHub's web interface, for example.

git fetch
--prune
-p

Note that this removes all obsolete local remote-tracking branches for any remote branches that no longer exist on the remote

git fetch origin --prune
git fetch origin -p # Shorter

Here is the relevant quote from the 1.6.6 release notes (emphasis mine):

"git fetch" learned --all and --multipleoptions, to run fetch from many repositories, and --prune option to remove remote tracking branches that went stale. These make "git remote update" and "git remote prune" less necessary (there is no plan to remove "remote update" nor "remote prune", though).

Alternatively, instead of pruning your obsolete local remote-tracking branches through git fetch -p, you can avoid making the extra network operation by just manually removing the branch(es) with the --remote or -r flags:

git branch --delete --remotes origin/X
git branch -dr origin/X # Shorter

From your illustration, I can see there are local clone repo and remote origin repo. So there are at least two physical branches. Where is the third branch to delete? Is the third branch only a pointer pointing to a commit in the local clone repo?

@huggie that's pretty much correct. Branches in Git are just bookmarks attached to commits. So in my graphs above, there are X and origin/X bookmarks in the local clone (2 branches), and then there is X on the remote (making 3 branches).

+1 for the remote tracking branch. This branch is what causes issues when you clone someone else's branch. It keeps on tracking your commits and asking you if you want to push to that person's branch.

How do I delete a Git branch both locally and remotely? - Stack Overfl...

git git-branch git-remote
Rectangle 27 1412

The Long Answer: there are 3 different branches to delete!

If you want more detailed explanations of the following commands, then see the long answers in the next section.

Deleting a remote branch:

git push origin --delete <branch>  # Git version 1.7.0 or newer
git push origin :<branch>          # Git versions older than 1.7.0

Deleting a local branch:

git branch --delete <branch>
git branch -d <branch> # Shorter version
git branch -D <branch> # Force delete un-merged branches

Deleting a local remote-tracking branch:

When you're dealing with deleting branches both locally and remotely, keep in mind that there are 3 different branches involved:

  • The local remote-tracking branch origin/X that tracks the remote branch X.
git branch -rd origin/bugfix
origin/bugfix
bugfix
origin

To delete that actual remote branch

git push origin --delete bugfix

The following sections describe additional details to consider when deleting your remote and remote-tracking branches.

Note that deleting the remote branch X from the command line using a git push will also delete the local remote-tracking branch origin/X, so it is not necessary to prune the obsolete remote-tracking branch with git fetch --prune or git fetch -p, though it wouldn't hurt if you did it anyway.

You can verify that the remote-tracking branch origin/X was also deleted by running the following:

# View just remote-tracking branches
git branch --remotes
git branch -r

# View both strictly local as well as remote-tracking branches
git branch --all
git branch -a

If you didn't delete your remote branch X from the command line (like above), then your local repo will still contain (a now obsolete) remote-tracking branch origin/X. This can happen if you deleted a remote branch directly through GitHub's web interface, for example.

git fetch
--prune
-p

Note that this removes all obsolete local remote-tracking branches for any remote branches that no longer exist on the remote

git fetch origin --prune
git fetch origin -p # Shorter

Here is the relevant quote from the 1.6.6 release notes (emphasis mine):

"git fetch" learned --all and --multipleoptions, to run fetch from many repositories, and --prune option to remove remote tracking branches that went stale. These make "git remote update" and "git remote prune" less necessary (there is no plan to remove "remote update" nor "remote prune", though).

Alternatively, instead of pruning your obsolete local remote-tracking branches through git fetch -p, you can avoid making the extra network operation by just manually removing the branch(es) with the --remote or -r flags:

git branch --delete --remotes origin/X
git branch -dr origin/X # Shorter

From your illustration, I can see there are local clone repo and remote origin repo. So there are at least two physical branches. Where is the third branch to delete? Is the third branch only a pointer pointing to a commit in the local clone repo?

@huggie that's pretty much correct. Branches in Git are just bookmarks attached to commits. So in my graphs above, there are X and origin/X bookmarks in the local clone (2 branches), and then there is X on the remote (making 3 branches).

+1 for the remote tracking branch. This branch is what causes issues when you clone someone else's branch. It keeps on tracking your commits and asking you if you want to push to that person's branch.

How do I delete a Git branch both locally and remotely? - Stack Overfl...

git git-branch git-remote